PIECE OF WOOD FROM THE ROOM IN THE WHITE HOUSE WHERE LINCOLN SIGNED THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION

$3,500.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 945-297

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“A piece of wood from the White House where President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation and usd (sic) as a private office by the Presidents since Jefferson’s time. Presented to Genl. W. J. Palmer by his friend and Comrade Col. W.M. Palmer staff of the late Maj. General Wm. J. Sewall.”

A great relic. The 11” x 9” card to which the wood is attached is dated “White House / Washington DC June 1902”. Patriotic American flag in red, white & blue attached to the top. Beautiful calligraphy.

Wood measures ½” x 7” x 1/8”.

William Jackson Palmer (September 18, 1836 – March 13, 1909) was an American civil engineer, soldier, industrialist, and philanthropist. During the Civil War, he was promoted to Brevet Brigadier General and was a Medal of Honor recipient. Palmer's early career helping build and develop the expanding railroads of the United States in Pennsylvania was interrupted by the American Civil War. He served in colorful fashion as a Union Army cavalry Colonel and was appointed to the brevet grade of Brigadier General. After the war, he contributed financially to educational efforts for the freed former slaves of the South. Heading west in 1867, while Palmer helped build the Kansas Pacific Railway he met a young English doctor, Dr. William Abraham Bell who became his friend and partner in most of his business ventures in which we would generally find Palmer as president with Bell as vice president. The two men are best known as co-founders of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad (Rio Grande). The Rio Grande and its successors eventually operated the largest network of narrow gauge railroad in the United States, and ultimately became part of the 21st century Union Pacific Railroad. Palmer and Bell are notable for observing in Great Britain (Bell's country of origin) and helping introduce to the United States railroads, the practices of burning coal (rather than wood) and the use of narrow gauge railroading. He helped develop rail-related industries in Colorado, such as a large steel mill near Pueblo. He was the founder of the new city of Colorado Springs, in 1871, as well as several other communities. After moving west, Palmer continued his philanthropic efforts in his adopted home, particularly educational institutions of higher education. Public schools in Colorado Springs were named for both him and his wife, Mary (née Mellen) Palmer, who was known by her nickname of "Queen". A statue of Palmer also exists in downtown Colorado Springs, across from the school named in his honor.

William Joyce Sewell (December 6, 1835 – December 27, 1901) was an Irish-American politician, merchant, and military officer who served as a U.S. Senator from New Jersey. Sewell was born in Castlebar, County Mayo, Ireland. He immigrated to the United States in 1851 where he worked in the merchant industry in Chicago, Illinois before moving to Camden, New Jersey in 1860. He served as an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War, receiving the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Sewell began his Civil War service as a Captain with the 5th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on August 28, 1861. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on July 7, 1862 and colonel on January 6, 1863. Sewell commanded a brigade at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, where he was wounded. He was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1896 for his actions. Sewell was the only officer to be awarded the Medal of Honor while in command of a New Jersey regiment. Sewell was severely wounded again at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, while commanding his unit along Emmitsburg Road on the second day of the battle, July 2, 1863. His wounds forced him from the field for a significant period. He resigned on July 6, 1863 and returned on October 1, 1864. On his return he was given command of the 38th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, but his wounds eventually caused him to end his Civil War field service. He was reassigned as commander of Fort Powhatan in the Department of Virginia from January to April 1865. Sewell was mustered out of the volunteers on June 30, 1865. In recognition of Sewell's service, on January 13, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Sewell for appointment to the brevet grade of brigadier general, United States Volunteers for "gallant and meritorious services at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Va.," to rank from March 13, 1865 and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on March 12, 1866. On July 18, 1868, President Andrew Johnson nominated Sewell for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers for "gallant and meritorious services during the war," to rank from March 13, 1865 and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on July 23, 1868.He was also a postbellum state senator and U.S. Senator. The community of Sewell, New Jersey is named for him.

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