MODEL 1860 COLT ARMY IDENTIFIED TO AN OFFICER OF THE 2nd PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY WITH A WARTIME IMAGE OF THE OFFICER

$6,950.00

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Item Code: 401-36

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Revolver is in overall exceptional condition with a strong engraved ID on the backstrap. All serial numbers match including the wedge. Serial number of “8309” shows that this weapon was manufactured in 1861.

Round .44 barrel is 8.00 inches long and shows approx. 45% of the original blue. Front blade sight is present and the top of the barrel has a slightly worn marking of “ADDRESS COL. SAML. COLT NEW-YORK U.S. AMERICA.” Bore has good rifling and is very clean. Small amount of case colors are left on the loading lever which works properly. Area around the wedge pin has only a few minor indentations and the wedge screw shows slight wear.

Six shot cylinder has all original nipples in good condition. Pin stops are also good. Cylinder scene is close to 100% and surface shows hints of blue. Action is strong and works properly. Frame still shows a good amount of the original case colors and has three screws that show almost no wear. Left side of the frame has a crisp marking of “COLT’S PATENT.”

Triggerguard is showing all brass while the iron grip strap matches the rest of the weapon. Wood grips are in good used condition with the left side having one small old chip at bottom. Left side has visible military inspector’s cartouche.

Clearly and strongly engraved on the backstrap is “CHARLES CHAUNCEY. 2ND PA. CAV.”

With the revolver is a wonderful full standing CDV of Captain Chauncey posed leaning against a podium. He wears a dark forage cap and a dark commercial sack coat with shoulder straps, matching dark trousers, knee high boots and gauntlets. He also wears his sword belt with shoulder support strap and saber. The image is bright, clear and clean. Back mark is for BROADBENT & CO. of PHILADELPHIA. Period pencil inscription on reverse reads “CAPTAIN CHARLES CHAUNCEY 1862 1ST PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY.” A previous owner has corrected the regimental designation by adding “2ND PA. CAV.” in modern pencil.

Charles Chauncey was born in Philadelphia on August 15, 1838. He was mustered in as 1st Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry on December 23, 1861.

Lt. Chauncey served as Adjutant until July 1, 1862 when he was promoted to Captain of Company K. Records show that he was present for duty from his date of enlistment through December of 1862 and took part in all the scouting and skirmishing done by the regiment during that time including covering the retreat of Pope’s Army of Virginia from 2nd Bull Run.

On December 28, 1862 Captain Chauncey led 150 troopers across the Occoquan River and was ambushed by 3000 men under Confederate General Wade Hampton. After a fierce fight that lasted for some time Captain Chauncey was forced to pull back across the river with the Confederates in hot pursuit. The Confederates managed to capture a few men but Chauncey and the bulk of his force escaped.

In early April of 1863 the regiment was assigned to the 2nd Brigade of General Julius Stahel’s Division. On April 2nd Captain Chauncey was detailed as an Aide-de-camp on General Stahel’s staff. During the Gettysburg Campaign Stahel’s Division was assigned to the Army of the Potomac. General Pleasonton removed Stahel from command and replaced him with General Kilpatrick. During the battle of Gettysburg the 2nd Pennsylvania was used as Provost Guard stopping stragglers to the rear and escorting Confederate prisoners to Westminster, Maryland.

Shortly after Gettysburg Captain Chauncey was assigned as commanding officer at Camp Buford, Maryland where he organized dismounted men and received new horses. He would remain at Camp Buford until September 11, 1863 when he returned to his regiment.

The winter of 1863 to 64 saw Captain Chauncey on detached duty as Judge Advocate General in Warrenton, Virginia. Returning to the 2nd Pennsylvania Cavalry in March 1864 he was present for the actions at Todd’s Tavern, Spotsylvania Court House, Trevillian Station and St. Mary’s Church.

On August 18, 1864 Chauncey reported sick to the hospital and was discharged on September 30, 1864.

With the revolver and CDV comes all of Captain Chauncey’s military records from the National Archives and a Colt Company research letter showing that revolver #8309 was shipped on August 6, 1861 to the War Department care of the New York Arsenal, Governor’s Island, New York.

Truly a museum quality identified Colt grouping.  [ad]

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