NEW YORK RECRUITING BROADSIDE

$1,250.00 SOLD

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Item Code: 30-1988

Measures 13” x 18”. Frame measures 15 3/4" x 22".  “ATTENTION PATRIOTS” in large letters at top. “There will be a meeting held at” followed by “Lockport Town Hall” in pencil. “An Address will be delivered by” followed by “Ralph W. Emerson”.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882), known professionally as Waldo Emerson, was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. After long resisting attempts by reformers to gain his support for various social issues, Emerson became a fervent advocate in the 1850's for abolitionism, though his efforts were too late and too local to make him a national leader. However, Emerson had strong feelings regarding the rights of personal freedom in every man, and ultimately close abolitionist friends like Orestes Brownson, Theodore Parker, and William Channing who encouraged him to voice his opinion.  He spoke out about the Fugitive Slave Law, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the execution of John Brown. “Bronson Alcott reports that upon first hearing the news of Brown's revolt Emerson said little, and adds “it seemed to be a painful subject to him.” His first written comments on the event are contained in a letter to his son dated October 23, 1859: "We are all very well, in spite of the sad Harper's Ferry business, which interests us all who had Brown for our guest twice…He is a true hero, but lost his head there.” Goodwin, 157). As Emerson wrote: "I think we must get rid of slavery or we must get rid of freedom.... If you put a chain around the neck of a slave, the other end fastens itself around your own."

 

The text of the broadside continues, “On the subject of the War and the necessity of the Union of the States. After the Lecture there will be an opportunity for all those who wish to enlist in the cause of putting down Rebellion, who can then have a good opportunity to do so, under the command of T.H. ALLEN, Who is authorized to raise a company of Riflemen, to join the Eagle Brigade now forming at Buffalo, under the command of Gen. Scroggs.” Written at the lower left in pencil is, “Fredonia Advertiser Print 1862”.

T. H. Allen is Truman H. Allen, a direct descendant of General Ethan Allen, who was a blacksmith from Keeseville, Essex County, NY.  He served in the 112th New York, the 22nd New York Cavalry, and apparently, though not definitely confirmed by our research, in the 68th New York Infantry.

Allen enlisted on 8/29/62 at Pomfret, NY as a Private. On 9/1/62 he was mustered into Co. I, 112th New York Infantry. He was discharged on 6/22/63 at New York, NY for “irregular enlistment”; he was “Absent with leave to obtain substitutes at Fredonia, NY since September 6 1862…”  This would explain his presence at the meeting described in the broadside.

Gen. Gustavus A. Scroggs of the New York State Militia was authorized in August 1861 to recruit a brigade of four regiments in the Buffalo, NY area, referred to as the Eagle Brigade. Only one regiment was completed, the 100th NY. Other men recruited were absorbed into the 78th, 95th, 132nd and 162nd New York regiments.

Allen re-enlisted on 2/9/64 as a Captain and was commissioned into Co. K, 22nd New York Cavalry. Two sources also mention him being mustered into the 68th New York but no other information has been found regarding any service in this unit. While in the 22nd NY Cavalry, he was wounded in action at the Wilderness (broken ribs) and at Cold Harbor (shot in the foot). He was discharged for disability on 7/27/64. After the war he was involved in wagon manufacturing in Corry, PA. He raised the first company of National Guards in Pennsylvania at Corry; he afterward raised four other companies and was Senior Captain in command of the battalion. He was afterward commissioned Division QM on the staff of Maj. Gen. H.S. Huidecooper; he resigned that commission to move to California, where he assisted in raising the Oakland Light Cavalry. In 1882 he was elected County Clerk of Alameda County and in 1884 returned to wagon making and blacksmithing. He held several offices in the GAR and was appointed Pension Agent by President Cleveland in 1885. Allen died in 1896 and is buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland, CA.

Condition is good with some old tape staining, some minor edge paper loss and minor staining. It is remarkable that these survived. Further research certainly a possibility.   [ss,ld]

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