THE DAILY [NEW ORLEANS] DELTA—JUNE 3, 1861

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Vol. XVI—No. 170. 4 pp.,16 x 26”, six columns.  Exhibits light chipping at margins, small unobtrusive tape repair right center margin, six inch, inward  horizontal tear from right margin. Else VG, entirely intelligible, and highly revealing of the New Orleans mood in early summer 1861.

This newspaper was one  of a number published in New Orleans during the —(others included The Bee, The Daily Crescent, The Picayune). And, the Daily Delta front page regularly featured a column treating what their crosstown rivals had to say--“What The Morning Journals Say.” For example,  in this issue, some commentary  from The Crescent concerning the pressure England, France and Spain and their governments  might soon bring to bear on the Lincoln administration:

“Their governments know full well that the only chance they have of obtaining adequate supplies of the indispensable “Imperial Staple,” lies in a short war, triumph of southern arms, and the recognition of the Confederate States of America by the “Gorilla” at Washington. And, as sensible statesmen, there rules will shape their policy accordingly. The first steps have already been taken by England France and Spain will soon speak.” [A vain hope. Despite pro-Confederate sympathies in the higher reaches of the British, French and Spanish governments, none of these countries  ever shaped their policies to serious Confederate advantage. Southern cotton  turned out to be not  the  powerful bargaining bait the Confederacy had hoped).

Another column features a letter from a “Special Correspondent  in Virginia,” with  news of favorable reception of Louisiana troops  recently arrived:

“The Louisiana  troops which have passed through Lynchburg are spoken of in highest terms. The Washington Artillery are expected to arrive to day. They are looked for with a great deal curiosity, and will meet with a cordial reception from the hospitable people of Lynchburg.”

Telegraphic News” offers the following headlines:

“The War in Virginia…Battle at Phillipi…Seventy Federalists Killed…Only Six Confederates Killed Kiled”

The “City Intelligence” column features news of “A Daring Burglary”, “A Stabbing”,  and the following item, “A Serious Affray.”:

“Thomas Shaw was arrested in the Second District last night, for having dangerously wounded a man named John West, on board the steamer Texas, by knocking him on the head with a hammer. West is not expected to live.”

Among the numerous listings for military recruits are a pair of want ads for musicians: “5 drummers and 2 buglers for the Orleans Artillery”  “A drummer and fifer for the Avegno rifles.”

The “For Sale” column includes the following slave trade item: “Over one hundred Negroes were brought in last night from my farm…A large many of them have been on the place for the past year and longer, and all passed the last summer. Virginia and Maryland Negroes with the advantages of acclimatation and trained to plantation labor, offer inducements to purchasers…Walter L. Campbell, 54 Barrone St., near Common..”

From the Lost, Found & Runaway section:

“Twenty Five Dollars Reward—Ran away, from the corner of Seventh and Camp streets, on the 22nd of March, the dark griffe woman MARIA. She is between 28 and 30, tall and well formed, has thick lips, and her front teeth are much decayed. She always dresses, well, and her clothes fit neatly Had on when she left a spotted chocolate and white calico dress, black apron, and a bright colored head handkerchief. She carried off a green sun-bonnet and a bundle of clothes. She may attempt pass herself off as free…Captains of steamboats and ship are notified not receive said slave on their vessels. I will pay the above reward to any person who will arrest and  deliver her to me…J.B. Cotton, 12 Exchange Place.”

News from the “Financial” columns provides the glint of a  hint—(in June 1861)—of harder times to come, as the Union naval blockade grip. to tighten its grip   “The past week has been marked by a steady diminution in every kind of business, and by unusual irregularity in rates of money, stocks, and bonds.

The Daily Delta Shipping sections  list only three vessels bound  for Liverpool, England, as opposed to the numerous vessels sailing thence in the weeks prior to  the firing on Ft. Sumter. Not that the Confederacy was wasn’t attempting to fight back at sea. For example, this final shipping notice:

LETTERS OF MARQUE AND REPRISAL. The undersigned will furnish parties who desire them with the proper forms to enable them to obtain Commissions for Privateering under authority of the Confederate States of America. Walter H. Peters, Notary Public., 50 Camp Street.

A fascinating issue  issue of the New Orleans Daily Delta, for Louisiana Civil War buffs and “NOLA” aficionados. In protective sleeve w/white card backing.  [jp]

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