9th PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY ORDER BOOKS AND REUNION RIBBONS

$695.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 112-53

Shipping: Determined by Method & Location of buyer

To Order:
Call 717-334-0347,
Fax 717-334-5016, or E-mail

Set of two order books from the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Companies “C” & “D”. The Clothing Book, used for the years 1861-1864, contains the hand- written records of clothing items that were given to the soldiers, such as socks, pants, drawers, shirts, jackets, blankets, ponchos and boots. These records list the items as well as the date of issue, monetary value of the items, and the soldier’s signature.

Consolidated Morning Report Book contains the roll call records from 1864-1865. It lists how many officers, privates, surgeons, recruits etc. were present each day. The back of the book contains monthly records.

The binding on the books is very distressed, and the front cover on the Consolidated Morning Report is completely unattached. The corners of both books are bent and the leather is worn away. Some pages are loose but these books are in good condition considering their age and amount of use they received. The pages of both books are yellowed, but in remarkable shape, with no tears. There is gilt lettering on the spines, some of which has worn off. Books measure approximately 16-1/2” X 10- ¾”.

Included in this set is a typed copy of a journal from Jacob Keller of the 9th Penn Cavalry, Co. “C” and the 2nd Regiment Veteran Volunteers (post- Civil War). It is mostly short lines about the routine life of a soldier, but then contains a detailed first-hand account of the hanging of Mary Surratt and the other conspirators, as Keller was detailed to the prison wall to watch the execution.  Also are copies of a photograph of Jacob Keller, his pension record, death certificate, and his widow’s pension record. There is information included about the regiment’s history.

Two reunion ribbons for the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry are part of this set. They are from the years 1915 and 1920. They are both yellow silk and have some light surface dirt. The 1910 ribbon is for the 46th reunion at Gettysburg and is 6” long.  The 1920 ribbon is for the 51st reunion in Wilkes-Barre, PA and is 5” long.

This is an amazing collection of items that gives not just the regimental history of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry, but also a soldier’s personal recollections and experiences of being in this unit. It is a rare find indeed, to have both aspects come together to have a more complete understanding of a soldier’s daily life in this regiment.

Regimental History of the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry

The 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry was organized August 29, 1861, at Camp Cameron near Harrisburg. It was composed of 12 companies, mostly recruited from the counties of south-central and southeast Pennsylvania.

After recruitment and initial training, the regiment was sent to Kentucky, where it was assigned to the Department of the Cumberland and given additional training. In March, it was ordered into Tennessee, where it fought several battles over the next few months with John Hunt Morgan's Confederate cavalry, capturing hundreds of his men, including his second-in-command and his quartermaster. After the Battle of Richmond on August 30, 1862, it covered the retreat of the Union Army of Kentucky along with the 9th Kentucky Cavalry. Being assigned to the Army of the Ohio, it saw only some skirmishing at the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862. Near the end of January 1863, Colonel Williams resigned his commission and Lieutenant Colonel James died, leaving Major Jordan in command of the 9th. During the Chickamauga campaign during the late summer of 1863, the regiment fought in several skirmishes and captured part of the advance guard of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's corps. During the Battle of Chickamauga, it guarded the right flank of the Union army, and, after the rout of the Union left wing, continued fighting with Thomas.

In April 1864, the regiment re-enlisted and was given a furlough so it could return to Pennsylvania to recruit more men. The 9th helped defeat Morgan during another of his raids into Kentucky and in September fought Joseph Wheeler's raid into Tennessee.

After this, it joined Sherman in his march to the sea and later in his march through the Carolinas, fighting several times with Wheeler, including at the Battle of Griswoldville. During this time, Colonel Jordan was promoted to brigadier general and Lieutenant Colonel Kimmel was promoted to command of the regiment. On April 17, 1865, the 9th served as part of the escort who traveled with General Sherman to meet General Johnston at the Bennett Farm near Durham Station. After the surrender of General Joseph E. Johnston's army at the Bennett Place in North Carolina, the 9th was mustered out at Lexington, Kentucky, and finally disbanded at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

The 9th fought against the famous Confederate leaders Forrest, Wheeler and Morgan, among others. Even early in the war when Confederate cavalry was normally superior to most Union forces, the regiment won most of its encounters with the enemy.

Casualties

Killed and mortally wounded: 6 officers, 66 enlisted men

Died of disease: 2 officers, 155 enlisted men

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS,

CLICK ON ‘CONTACT US’ AT THE TOP OF ANY PAGE ON THE SITE,

THEN ON ‘LAYAWAY POLICY’.

THANK YOU!

Inquire »

Inquire About 9th PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY ORDER BOOKS AND REUNION RIBBONS

should be empty

featured item

M1834 US REVENUE MARINE SWORD BY HORSTMANN

US Revenue Cutter Service Sword, Model 1834, also referred to as US Revenue Marine. Manufactured 1834-62. A scarce sword made for officers of the United States Revenue Cutter Service or Revenue Marines. This was a small but prestigious branch of our… (870-37). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

23
Oct

Coming up Oct. 27-28: Autumn Gettysburg Show, Allstar Events Complex at the Eisenhower Inn Learn More »