DUG LEAD ID DISC FOR 74TH NEW YORK SOLDIER - ROUGH CONDITION

$295.00
Originally $350.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 149-22

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This disc was dug in the greater Richmond area and did not fare well during its time in the ground. Its edges are badly chipped with 55%-60% material loss. Both sides of the disc also show chipping and material loss.

At center of the obverse is a bust of George Washington. The entire bust and all its details are clearly visible. The only legible printing is above Washington’s head and reads “…RGE WASHINGTO…” the rest is either missing or encrusted with discoloration and dirt.

The reverse is very difficult to read with the naked eye. With a loop the top edge inscription can be made out. It reads “…P. VANDERBE…” The center of the disc is a little clearer and the naked eye can read “CO… 5TH REGT. EXC...” With a loop the company letter “E” can be seen. There are other inscriptions below the regiment that look to be battle honors but they are too hard to read even with a loop.

The 5th Regiment of the Excelsior Brigade was the 74th New York. The soldier that the disc belonged to without a doubt was Jacob P. Vanderbeck of Company E.

Jacob P. Vanderbeck was born in Jersey City, New Jersey on August 8, 1846. He enlisted as a drummer in Company E, 74th New York Infantry at Liverpool Point, Maryland on February 1, 1862. At the time of Vanderbeck’s enlistment the 74th had been serving with the Army since October of 1861.

The 74th was assigned to the 3rd Corps of the Army of the Potomac and went with it to the Peninsula where it saw action at Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Oak Grove, Glendale and Malvern Hill. Drummer Vanderbeck was present with his company during these engagements but on August 27th he took a little vacation and was listed as “absent without leave.” When he returned to the regiment is not known but he is listed as being present in September and October. Despite several one day trips to the regimental hospital for tonsillitis, bronchitis and catarrh in October, Vanderbeck remained with his company until February 11, 1863 when he reported to the regimental hospital with diarrhea. He was discharged for disability on March 4, 1863.

After his discharge Vanderbeck returned to New Jersey and spent the years bouncing back and forth between there and New York State. He was a member of the G. Van Houten Post #3 of the GAR in Jersey City. He was married twice, his first wife having died, and raised several children.

He died at the home of his son in Stamford, Connecticut on March 23, 1916.   [ad]

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