ABSTRACT OF INFANTRY TACTICS…OF THE UNITED STATES, ID’D TO PRIVATE DAVID WOOD LACY, 7TH VIRGINIA INFANTRY

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Item Code: 846-163

Owner inscription in pencil, rear eps—“Mr. David W. Lacy book/ Oak Park/ Madison County/ Virginia.” Published by Moss & Brother, Philadelphia, 1856. 138 pp., diagrams. Brown buckram with blind-stamped cover eagle, 7.625 x 4.75”, with gilt spine lettering. Exhibits light wear at extremities, buckram somewhat faded, gilt spine lettering bright. Slight foxing throughout while remaining entirely legible. Else VG.

David Wood Lacy was born in 1837 and age 22, a mechanic by trade, when he mustered as a private into Co. “A”, 7th VA Infantry, 4/23/1861 and seems to have served with the regiment throughout the war. Muster rolls are incomplete, but he appears as “present” on all of those surviving, up to August 31, 1864, and was certainly present beyond that since we find his name on a stray clothing receipt dated December 1864.

The regiment was officially organized in May, 1861, at Manassas Junction, Virginia, with men from Giles, Madison, Rappahannock, Culpeper, Greene, Mercer, Monroe and Albemarle counties, and served under Early, Ewell, Hill, Kemper, and William R. Terry. Lacy thus had plenty of opportunities to serve under fire with Company A, including Manassas, where the regiment lost 47 men and Williamsburg, where it lost 77. On 6/16/62, during the Peninsular Campaign, Lacy was transferred from Co. A into the regimental band, which might seem an advantageous posting, except that as regiments moved into action bandsmen put aside their instruments to aid the surgeons and stretcher crews, giving them all danger of enemy bullets and none of the satisfaction of firing back. Just two weeks after his new posting the regiment lost 111 men Frayer’s Farm, also known as Glendale, when Confederates attacked McClellan’s column as he withdrew from Fair Oaks and headed toward Harrison’s Landing. They were heavily engaged throughout the rest of the war as well, losing 59 at Second Manassas and some 49% of 335 who entered the fight at Gettysburg. Only 20 officers and men were present at the surrender at Appomattox. Lacy survived the war, dying in 1897. He is buried in Mount Zion United Methodist Cemetery in Oakpark, Virginia.

This is a solid 7th Virginia/ ANV ID’D collectible.  Accompanied by research material.  [jp/ld/sr]

[jp/ld/sr]

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