CDV THREE-QUARTER STANDING VIEW OF QUINCY A. GILLMORE AS A BRIGADIER GENERAL

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Item Code: 259-106

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CDV shows Gillmore posed leaning against a table holding his forage cap in his hand. The cap is held in such a way that the “US” in a wreath insignia is visible.

The General wears a dark double-breasted frock coat with velvet collar and cuffs and Brigadier General’s shoulder straps.

Image is bright and clear with excellent contrast. Usual light surface dirt from age and storage is present.

Reverse has a strong period ink inscription at the top that reads “MAJ. GEN. Q. A. GILMORE COMDG. DEPT. OF THE SOUTH.” Photographer’s imprint is for C. D. FREDERICKS & CO.

Quincy Adams Gillmore was born February 28, 1825 in Ohio. He began his career after graduating first in his class at the United State Military Academy in 1849.  He was commissioned into the Corps of Engineers, and taught briefly at West Point.  At the outbreak of the Civil War, Gillmore was placed on the staff of General Thomas W. Sherman, and first saw service during the Union Army’s Port Royal expedition.  He became very well known for taking part in the Siege of Fort Pulaski.  During the siege, Gillmore advocated the use of rifled naval guns, and was able to effectively breach the mason walls of the fort with the new technology.  Gillmore’s actions at Fort Pulaski effectively brought an end to the use of large masonry forts.  He was promoted to Brigadier General on April 28, 1862, and then to Major General on July 10, 1863.  He was placed in charge of the Department of the South as well as the X Corps, and commanded these troops during the campaign to recapture Fort Sumter during the summer of 1863.  It was during this time that Gillmore commanded the capture of Batteries Wagner and Gregg.  In May of 1864, he was transferred to the Army of the James and took part in the Bermuda Hundred operations.  On July 11, 1864, Gillmore was crucial in helping raise units in and around Washington, DC when Confederate General Jubal A. Early threatened the city.

With the threat to Washington over the XIX Corps was transferred to the Army of the Shenandoah and Gillmore was reassigned to the Western Theater as inspector of military fortifications. As the war was drawing to an end he was reassigned to command of the Department of the South one final time and was in command when Charleston and Fort Sumter were finally turned over to Union forces. He received brevet promotions to Brigadier General and Major General in the U.S. Army for the campaign against Battery Wagner, Morris Island and Fort Sumter dated March 13, 1865.

With the war over, he resigned from the volunteer army on December 5, 1865.

After the war Gillmore returned to New York City and became a well known civil engineer, authoring several books and articles on structural materials, including cement. He was involved in the reconstruction of fortifications along the Atlantic coast (including, ironically, some that he had destroyed as a Union general). He served on the Rapid Transit Commission that planned the elevated trains and mass public transportation, as well as leading efforts for harbor improvements and coastal defenses. He was a prominent member of the University Club of New York.

General Gillmore died at Brooklyn, New York, at the age of 63. His son and grandson, both also named Quincy Gillmore, were also generals in the U.S. Army.  [ad]

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