BUST VIEW OF MAJOR GENERAL PHIL KEARNY, KILLED AT CHANTILLY

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Item Code: 259-116

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Vignette left profile image of Kearny in the uniform of a brigadier general.

Image is clear and clean. Contrast is just a bit light.

Reverse has an old ink inscription “MAJ. GEN. KEARNY” along with a back mark of R. W. ADDIS… WASHINGTON, D. C.

Philip Kearny Jr. was born June 1, 1815 in New York City. Although Kearny was quite wealthy as a result of inheriting money from his grandparents, he chose to join the military and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 1st Dragoons in 1837.  Shortly after joining the regiment, Kearny traveled to France where he attended the French Cavalry School in Saumur. He then served in Algiers with the French cavalry in 1840.  Returning to the United States, he became the aide-de-camp for Generals Alexander Macomb and Winfield Scott.  He served during the Mexican War where he participated in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco.  During the battle of Churubusco, he received an injury to his left arm which resulted in its amputation.  Kearny continued to serve until the wars end when he resigned from the United States army and moved to France.  While there, he served in the Imperial Guard of Napoleon III and fought in the battles of Magenta and Solferino.

When the Civil War began Kearny returned home to the United States and was one of the first to be commissioned a brigadier general.  He was placed in charge of the First New Jersey Brigade.  On July 4, 1862, he was promoted to major general and was put in command of a division in General Samuel P. Heintzelman’s III Corps.  Kearny was later credited with developing the concept of corps badges, which would go on to be adopted by the entire army.  He led the division at the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, and throughout the Peninsula Campaign.  After the battle of Second Manassas, Kearny led the rearguard of the army and engaged Confederate forces at Chantilly.  While scouting positions near his lines, Kearny inadvertently rode into the Confederate positions, and was killed while attempting to escape.  General Robert E. Lee, who held great respect for General Kearny, forwarded his remains under a flag of truce to Union lines in order to ensure that the general would receive a proper burial.

His body was originally buried in an unmarked vault in Manhattan's Trinity Churchyard until 1912, when a member of his old brigade secured his re-burial with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery where he rests today under a large equestrian monument.  [ad]

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