WONDERFUL FIELD-WORN IDENTIFIED ARTILLERY OFFICER’S SLOUCH HAT: RINGGOLD LIGHT ARTILLERY AND ERMANTROUT’S BATTERY OF PENNSYLVANIA INDEPENDENT LIGHT ARTILLERY

$6,500.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 33-270

Shipping: Determined by Method & Location of buyer

To Order:
Call 717-334-0347,
Fax 717-334-5016, or E-mail

Real Civil War slouch hats have always been hard to find. Of those that survived many are full dress affairs that had no practical use after the war. This one is a rare survivor, showing wear and use commensurate with actual service in the field. The crown is slightly pushed in, something seen in countless photos of Civil War officers in the field. The ribbon around the base of the crown is in place and mostly complete though with some wear at the front where the knot of the officer’s hat cord rubbed against it. The officer’s hat cord shows use as well, with some oxidation, and the fragile black netting over the gold acorn ends is long gone, as should be expected. The central slide on the cord is also gone and the officer simply knotted the cord to keep it in place.

The body of the hat and the brim show only minor wear and no holes, but have oxidized slightly to a deep brownish/black tone. The edge binding of the brim is very good and securely in place, showing just a little wear at front right and left top, which would be the natural spots for someone to grasp it. The crossed-cannon officer’s bullion hat insignia is in place. The velvet pad has oxidized slightly toward blue and the lower left barrel of one cannon shows some minor tarnish, as does the border bullion. The border has moved down slightly from the upper edge, but is secure. The top edge shows a little wear to the fabric along the raised rim. The insignia was originally of medium quality, suitable for field wear, with the cannon barrels made of plain bullion strands highlighted with bright or live bullion for the astragals, muzzles and base rings of the barrels.

The left brim has been turned up using a hook fastened to the brim that engages a small thread loop on the side of the crown much like an enlisted Hardee hat. The bullion embroidered side eagle is in place and very nice. The edge wire is all there and secure, though pushed here and there from actual use and wear. The bullion has a pleasing, muted gold tone, with great detail to the wing feathers and a narrow red thread for the eagle’s tongue.

The interior is very good with 90 percent of the tall, light brown sweatband in place and secure, though showing some losses from wear. The sweatband seam at the back of the hat even still preserves a small shield-shaped piece that likely once held a maker’s label or size marking.

In old, period ink the initials “L.H.” are written on the sweatband. This is Levi Homan, who did two terms of service. He first enrolled at Reading, PA, and mustered in on 18 April 1861 as First Corporal in the Ringgold Light Artillery, qualifying him as one of Pennsylvania’s “First Defenders.” He was 36 at the time and a tailor by occupation. The Ringgold artillery were part of the 25th Pennsylvania, who rushed to Washington and engaged in barricading and guarding the city until reinforcements could arrive. The Ringgold Artillery, which was divided into two companies, guarded the Washington Arsenal, the Navy Yard, and also mounted heavy guns on Georgetown Heights. Having helped secure the city, they returned to Harrisburg with the other elements of the regiment and mustered out July 26.

Homan’s hat probably dates to his second term of service, when he again responded to an emergency in the summer of 1863. Pennsylvania called into service a number of militia and emergency regiments as Lee led Confederate troops north into Pennsylvania. The old Ringgold Artillery were again mobilized, this time as Ermantrout’s Battery of Pennsylvania Independent Light Artillery, and Homan’s experience gained him a commission as 2nd Lieutenant dating to 3 July 1863. These troops were held ready to defend the state’s capital in the fluid situation and then to secure the state in the wake of Lee’s retreat. Homan mustered out of active service with the rest of the company in August.

The hat is great example of an officer’s slouch hat for active service and would dress up an artillery display or officer’s group immensely. Resting on an officer’s saber with a pair of artillery shoulder straps next to it, it would draw you in from across the room.  [sr]

[sr]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS,

CLICK ON ‘CONTACT US’ AT THE TOP OF ANY PAGE ON THE SITE,

THEN ON ‘LAYAWAY POLICY’.

THANK YOU!

Inquire »

Inquire About WONDERFUL FIELD-WORN IDENTIFIED ARTILLERY OFFICER’S SLOUCH HAT: RINGGOLD LIGHT ARTILLERY AND ERMANTROUT’S BATTERY OF PENNSYLVANIA INDEPENDENT LIGHT ARTILLERY

should be empty

featured item

SIXTH ARMY CORPS STAFF OFFICER’S CHASSEUR STYLE KEPI WITH CORPS BADGE

In excellent condition, this wartime staff officer’s cap is the low-crowned chasseur style favored by many officers for its rather natty appearance. Made of medium blue wool that preserves its nap, the cap shows excellent color and virtually no… (33-261). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

17
Oct

Coming up: Autumn Gettysburg Show, Oct. 25 - 27 Learn More »