FRAMED ALBUMEN IMAGE OF MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE H. THOMAS’ HEADQUARTERS IN CHATTANOOGA

$1,500.00

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Item Code: 945-334

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Image shows Union soldiers standing outside of the house that was used as General Thomas’ headquarters. Soldiers are seen on the porch, leaning on the fence and chatting in small groups. Outbuildings are seen in the background. Hand-written inscription below image reads, “MAJ. GEN. GEORGE H. THOMAS’ HEAD QUARTERS, ARMY OF CUMBERLAND IN CHATTANOOGA FROM OCTOBER 1863 TO MAY 4, 1864.” This house was likely located at Knob Hill, as there are several references to that being where Grant and Thomas had headquarters, but we cannot find definitive proof of the name of this house of owner.

Image is clear with very good contrast. Shows light surface dirt and spotting in areas. Mat and gold border surround image.

Gold frame measures 17 ½” x 20 ½”. Frame is in excellent condition. Wire is mounted on reverse for hanging.

George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 – March 28, 1870) was a United States Army officer and a Union general during the Civil War, one of the principal commanders in the Western Theater. Thomas served in the Mexican-American War and later chose to remain with the U.S. Army for the Civil War, despite his heritage as a Virginian. He won one of the first Union victories in the war, at Mill Springs in Kentucky, and served in important subordinate commands at Perryville and Stones River. His stout defense at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863 saved the Union Army from being completely routed, earning him his most famous nickname, the "Rock of Chickamauga". He followed soon after with a dramatic breakthrough on Missionary Ridge in the Battle of Chattanooga. In the Franklin-Nashville Campaign of 1864, he achieved one of the most decisive victories of the war, destroying the army of Confederate General John Bell Hood, his former student at West Point, at the Battle of Nashville.

Thomas had a successful record in the Civil War, but he failed to achieve the historical acclaim of some of his contemporaries, such as Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman. He developed a reputation as a slow, deliberate general who shunned self-promotion and who turned down advancements in position when he did not think they were justified. After the war, he did not write memoirs to advance his legacy. [sl]

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