THREE QUARTER STANDING VIEW OF GENERAL JOHN A. DIX BY BRADY

$95.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 259-114

Shipping: Determined by Method & Location of buyer

To Order:
Call 717-334-0347,
Fax 717-334-5016, or E-mail

Image shows the General with his left hand resting on the hilt of a presentation grade officer’s sword. He wears matching dark frock coat and trousers. The coat has the usual black felt collar and cuffs with brush epaulettes at the shoulders. The General also wears a General Officer’s sash with New York militia officer’s belt plate of a Gothic style N.Y. in a wreath.

Image is clear with good contrast but does have foxing around the General. Just behind the General’s hip is “BRADY.” Bottom of the mount is printed “MAJ. GEN. JNO. A. DIX.” Mount corners are clipped.

Reverse has E. ANTHONY FROM A BRADY NEGATIVE back mark.

John Adams Dix was born in Boscawen, New Hampshire on July 24, 1798. He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy, and joined the US Army as an ensign in May 1813, serving under his father. He attained the rank of captain in August 1825, and resigned from the Army in December 1828.

In 1826, Dix was given the job of overseeing his father-in-law’s upstate New York land holdings in Cooperstown. Dix and his wife moved to Cooperstown in 1828, and he practiced law in addition to overseeing the land holdings. In 1830, he was appointed as Adjutant General of the New York State Militia, and moved to Albany. He was Secretary of State of New York from 1833 to 1839, and a member of the New York State Assembly in 1842.

Dix was elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill a vacancy and held office from 1845 to 1849. In November 1848, he was the Barnburner/Free-Soil candidate for Governor of New York, but was defeated. In February 1849, he ran for re-election to the U.S. Senate as the Barnburners' candidate, but the Whig majority of the State Legislature elected William H. Seward.

In 1853 Dix was president of the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad. He was appointed Postmaster of New York City and served from 1860 to 1861.

Dix was also the president of the Union Pacific from 1863 to 1868 during construction of the First Transcontinental Railroad.

Dix was appointed United States Secretary of the Treasury by President James Buchanan in January 1861.

With the start of the Civil War, Dix was appointed a major general in the New York Militia. He joined the Union Army as the highest ranking major general of volunteers during the war, effective May 16, 1861. In the summer of 1861, he commanded the Department of Maryland and the Department of Pennsylvania. His importance at the beginning of the Civil War was in arresting six members of the Maryland legislature and thereby preventing the legislature from meeting and earned him President Lincoln's gratitude. That winter, he commanded a regional organization known as "Dix's Command" within Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan's Department of the Potomac. Dix commanded the Department of Virginia from June 1862 until July 1863, and the Department of the East from July 1863 until April 1865.

On July 22, 1862, Dix and Confederate Major General Daniel Harvey Hill concluded an agreement for the general exchange of prisoners between the Union and Confederate armies.

Dix was considered too old for field command. Some believe that his most distinguished contribution to the war was the suppression of the New York Draft Riots in July 1863, although the rioting had already subsided by the time he replaced General John E. Wool. He was also active in the defense of Suffolk, which was part of his department.

He was United States Minister to France from 1866 to 186 and Governor of New York from 1873 to 1874, elected on the Republican ticket in November 1872, but defeated for re-election by Samuel J. Tilden in November 1874. He suffered another defeat when he ran for the Mayor of New York City in 1876. Dix died in New York City on April 21, 1879 and was buried at the Trinity Church Cemetery.

[ad]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS,

CLICK ON ‘CONTACT US’ AT THE TOP OF ANY PAGE ON THE SITE,

THEN ON ‘LAYAWAY POLICY’.

THANK YOU!

Inquire »

Inquire About THREE QUARTER STANDING VIEW OF GENERAL JOHN A. DIX BY BRADY

should be empty

featured item

REGULATION BRASS BUGLE IDENTIFIED TO MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT AND NATIONAL GAR COMMANDER WILMON BLACKMAR

Born in 1841 in Bristol, Bucks County, PA Blackmar was a 21 year old resident of Boston, MA when he enlisted on 8/30/1862 at Philadelphia, PA as a Corporal. On 8/30/1862 he mustered into "K" Co., 15th PA Cavalry. He was discharged for promotion on… (945-319). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

22
Sep

Coming up Oct. 3 - 7: N-SSA Fall Nationals, Fort Shenandoah, Winchester, VA Learn More »