CDV THREE-QUARTER STANDING VIEW OF MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE STONEMAN

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Item Code: 259-79

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CDV shows Stoneman wearing a dark double-breasted frock coat with brigadier general’s shoulder straps and matching dark trousers. At his waist his a general officer’s sash and presentation grade sword belt with rectangular plate. At his hip is a cavalry saber on which his left hand, also holding white gloves, rests. His right hand is by his side and is holding a forage cap.

Image is very clear with excellent contrast. Front bottom of mount has period pencil inscription that reads “GEN. STONEMAN.”

George Stoneman was born on a family farm in Busti, New York on August 8, 1822. He studied at the Jamestown Academy and graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1846; his roommate at West Point was future Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson.

During the war with Mexico he served with the 1st Dragoons in Kansas and California. When the Civil War began he was a Captain in a cavalry regiment and served under Gen. McClellan in West Virginia. When Gen. McClellan was made commander of the Army of the Potomac Stoneman was promoted to Brigadier General and made Chief of Cavalry.

After the Peninsula Campaign he commanded the 1st Division of the 3rd Corps and by the end of that year he commanded the Corps. He was promoted to Major General on March 16, 1863. When Gen. Joseph Hooker took command of the Army Stoneman was once again appointed Chief of Cavalry. During the Chancellorsville campaign Stoneman was sent on a raid. It turned out to be a fizzle and Stoneman was replaced by Alfred Pleasonton.

In early 1864 Stoneman requested another field command. He assumed command of the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Ohio and served in the Atlanta Campaign under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman. General Stoneman and his aide, Myles Keogh, were captured by Confederate soldiers outside Macon, Georgia, making him the highest ranking Union prisoner of war.

Stoneman was exchanged relatively quickly based on the personal request of General Sherman and returned to duty. In December 1864 he led a raid from East Tennessee into southwestern Virginia. He also led raids into North Carolina and in 1865 took Salem, Martinsville, destroyed Moratock Iron Furnace and at Salisbury attempted to free Union prisoners, but they had been dispersed before the Union forces arrived. In recognition of his service, Stoneman was brevetted major general in the regular army. His command nearly captured Confederate president Jefferson Davis during his flight from Richmond, Virginia. In June 1865 he was appointed commander of the Department of Tennessee and administered occupied Memphis. During this time he became opposed to what he saw as harsh reconstruction policies and joined the Democratic Party.

Stoneman mustered out of volunteer service in September 1866 and reverted to his regular army rank of lieutenant colonel. He took command of the Department of Arizona, First Military District, headquartered at Drum Barracks. He was relieved of this command in May 1871.

Stoneman then moved to California where he and his wife settled in the San Gabriel Valley on a 400-acre estate called Los Robles. He was appointed as a state railroad commissioner, serving from 1876 to 1878.

In 1882, Stoneman was elected governor of California as a Democrat and served a single four-year term. Sometime later his house was destroyed by fire, an event rumored to be the work of his political enemies. Stoneman was broken financially by the disaster and was in poor health.

He returned to New York State for medical treatment. He died following a stroke in Buffalo, New York, on September 5, 1894, at age 72. He is buried in the Bentley Cemetery in Lakewood, New York.  [ad]

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