IRONWARE-TRANSFERWARE SAUCER RECOVERED FROM MILLEDGEVILLE, GA.

$75.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 213-104

This is an ironstone saucer measuring approximately 6” in diameter x 1 ¼” deep. “Florilla” pattern by Edward Challinor from Tunstall, England who was in business 1842-1867. Colorful poly chrome transferware design with flowers and pagoda.

Transferware was developed in Staffordshire, England in around 1760, the technique consists of transferring a print from an engraved and inked copper plate to a sheet of paper. The paper is then applied to the unfired clay, be it earthenware or bone china, which absorbs the ink from the paper. After the paper is removed, the clay is glazed and fired. Ironware was a cheaper, mass-produced alternative for porcelain. There is no iron in ironstone; its name is derived from its notable strength and durability.

From Fred Edmunds collection, this and others were recovered from Oconee River in Milledgeville, Georgia.  [jet]

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