BANK CHECK SIGNED BY TWO UNION THIRD CORPS GENERALS – DANIEL E. SICKLES & JAMES B. CARR

$270.00

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Item Code: 410-490

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This item is an 1886 check drawn on Daniel Sickles account at the Bank of the Metropolis in New York’s Union Square. The check is made out to Major General J. B. Carr in the amount of $72.25 and is endorsed by Carr on the reverse as “J. B. CARR, MAJ. GEN.” Reverse also has cancelation stamps.

Check meas. approx. 8.00 x 3.00 inches and is in good condition. All ink is strong. Sickles signature is exceptionally bold.

Daniel Edgar Sickles was an American politician, soldier, and diplomat.

As an antebellum New York politician, Sickles was involved in a number of public scandals, most notably the killing of his wife's lover, Philip Barton Key II, son of Francis Scott Key. He was acquitted with the first use of temporary insanity as a legal defense in U.S. history.

Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, Sickles became one of the war's most prominent political generals, recruiting the New York regiments that became known as the Excelsior Brigade in the Army of the Potomac. Despite his lack of military experience, he served competently as a brigade, division, and corps commander in some of the early Eastern campaigns. His military career ended at the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, after he insubordinately moved his III Corps to a position where it was virtually destroyed. He left the battle with an amputated leg, struck by cannon fire, and was eventually awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. He devoted considerable effort to establishing his role in achieving the Gettysburg victory, writing articles and testifying before Congress in a manner that denigrated the intentions and actions of the army commander, Maj. Gen. George G. Meade. After the war, Sickles commanded military districts during Reconstruction, served as U.S. Minister to Spain, and eventually returned to Congress, where he made important legislative contributions for the preservation of the Gettysburg Battlefield.

James Bradford Carr was born in Albany, New York, the son of Irish immigrants, and worked as a tobacconist. While living in Troy, New York, he became interested in military affairs and by 1861 was a colonel in the New York militia.

At the start of the war, Carr was instrumental in the recruitment of the 2nd New York Volunteer Infantry and was appointed its colonel on May 14, 1861. Assigned to Fort Monroe, Virginia, the regiment took part in the engagement at Big Bethel. Carr served in the Army of the Potomac throughout the Peninsula Campaign and Seven Days Battles as well as the Northern Virginia Campaign. As a brigade commander in the III Corps, General Carr participated in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. In the latter battle he commanded a division after the death of General Hiram Berry.

Carr was promoted to brigadier general on September 7, 1862, for gallantry at Malvern Hill, but this promotion was plagued by procedural difficulties. His first appointment was returned to the president on February 12, 1863. He was reappointed on March 30, 1863, but the United States Senate failed to confirm the commission in the session in which he was nominated and it expired on March 30, 1864. He was renominated on April 9, 1864, and confirmed on June 30, 1864, with a date of rank of March 30, 1863.

He was distinguished for gallantry at Gettysburg, where he was wounded and his men stubbornly held their ground near the Peach Orchard. He commanded the 3rd Division of III Corps in the autumn campaigns of 1863. Because of the difficulties with his brigadier general appointment, he was technically junior to his own subordinate brigade commanders and on May 2, 1864, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant reassigned Carr to the Army of the James under Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler. Carr commanded a division of black troops in the XVIII Corps and briefly commanded the Defenses of Yorktown in the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. On March 13, 1865, Carr was appointed a brevet major general of volunteers, and he was mustered out of the volunteer service on August 24, 1865.

After the close of the war, Carr became a manufacturer in Troy, New York, then a Republican politician for New York State. He served as Secretary of State of New York from 1880 to 1885, elected in 1879, 1881, and 1883. In 1885, he ran on the Republican ticket for Lieutenant Governor of New York with Ira Davenport, but was defeated by Democrat Edward F. Jones. Carr died in Troy, New York on February 24, 1895 and is buried there in Oakwood Cemetery.  [ad]

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