NICE SEATED VIEW OF UNION MAJOR GENERAL JOHN G. PARKE IN CAMP CHAIR

$175.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 1097-250

CDV shows Parke seated in a folding camp chair and holding a Model 1860 Field and Staff Officer’s sword. He wears a dark slouch hat, dark commercial sack coat with major general’s shoulder straps and matching dark trousers. The General is seated in a three-quarter left profile position and looks at the camera from the left corner of each eye. A bit of an unusual pose.

Contrast and clarity are excellent. Mount and paper are good. Bottom mount corners have been clipped.

Reverse has a photographer’s imprint for T. M. SCHLEIER…NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE.

John Grubb Parke was born September 22, 1827 in Coatesville, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1849 and was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. As an engineer, he determined the boundary lines between Iowa and the Little Colorado River, surveyed routes for a railroad from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, and was the chief surveyor of the party charged with the delineation of the boundary of the northwest United States and British North America, 1857–1861.

At the start of the Civil War, Parke was appointed brigadier general of volunteers and commanded a brigade in the operations on the North Carolina coast in early 1862. He received a brevet promotion for the Battle of Fort Macon and was promoted to major general of volunteers on July 18, 1862.

In the Army of the Potomac, Parke served briefly as commander of 3rd Division, IX Corps. Then he served as chief of staff to Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside during the battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg. He assumed command of the IX Corps and was sent to the Western Theater for the Vicksburg Campaign. Parke then was Burnside's chief of staff in the Army of the Ohio in the defense of Knoxville.

Parke served as chief of staff to Burnside during the Overland Campaign, in which the latter commanded IX Corps, as well as in the beginning stages of the Siege of Petersburg. After the Battle of the Crater, Burnside was relieved of command and Parke assumed command of the IX Corps. He led it at the Battle of Globe Tavern, the Battle of Peebles' Farm, and the Battle of Boydton Plank Road.

In 1865, while Army of the Potomac commander Maj. Gen. George G. Meade was in a conference, Parke, being senior officer, was acting commander of the army during the Battle of Fort Stedman until Meade returned to the field. He led the IX Corps through the fall of Petersburg and the Appomattox Campaign. In 1865 he was appointed brevet major general in the regular army in recognition of his service at Fort Stedman.

After the Confederate surrender, Parke commanded IX Corps in the Department of Washington. He also briefly commanded XXII Corps. Parke was mustered out of the volunteer service on January 15, 1866. He served as an engineer, being promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel on March 4, 1879. Parke attained the rank of colonel on March 17, 1884. He served as superintendent of the United States Military Academy from August 28, 1887, to June 24, 1889, and he retired from the Army on July 2 of that year.

Parke wrote several reports on public improvements and exploration of the west. He also served as a cartographer, publishing maps of the New Mexico Territory and California.

Parke died in Washington, D.C., leaving a wife, Ellen, but no children. He is buried in the churchyard of Church of St. James the Less in Philadelphia.  [ad]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS,

CLICK ON ‘CONTACT US’ AT THE TOP OF ANY PAGE ON THE SITE,

THEN ON ‘LAYAWAY POLICY’.

THANK YOU!

Inquire About NICE SEATED VIEW OF UNION MAJOR GENERAL JOHN G. PARKE IN CAMP CHAIR

should be empty

featured item

CONFEDERATE GENERAL LUNSFORD LINDSAY LOMAX AS A U.S. CAVALRY SECOND LIEUTENANT

Formerly in the collection of Virginia collector and dealer Bill Turner this sixth plate ambrotype shows Confederate General Lunsford Lindsay Lomax as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, sometime between 1856 and 1861. Lomax was born in Rhode… (1138-1830). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

26
Sep

Redding's Auction Gun Show, Gettysburg - Sept 24th-25th Learn More »

Instagram