QUARTER PLATE TINTYPE OF 3 FEDERAL BOYS FROM THE 109TH NEW YORK INFANTRY

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Item Code: 2021-806

All three of these young men are identified inside the case. All three were 18 years of age when they mustered into the regiment in August, 1862.

Lewis Townley of Company K sits to the far right. Townley was promoted to sergeant, only to have his rank reduced back to private. A month later he was promoted again to corporal, but would be reduce back to private once again before years end. Townley appears to have gone west after the war; he is buried in Maple Grove Cemetery in Kasson, Dodge County, Minnesota,

At center sits Nathan Gaskill, also of Company K. He was made corporal in December 1862, and was wounded in action at North Anna River in May, 1864. He returned to the regiment and was mustered out with the rest of the men at then end of their enlistment. Born in 1844, he remained in New York State where he died in 1929; he is buried in Gaskill Corners Cemetery in Gaskill, NY.

To the far left sits Richard Furman. Richard spent the entire war serving as a private. Furman was born in Wyoming, PA. He is buried in Quicks Bend Cemetery in Wilmot, Bradford County, PA.

The men of the 109th saw their first real fighting during the Battle of the Wilderness, followed by fighting at Spotsylvania. It was in constant action through the remainder of the war. 614 men were killed or wounded during their term of enlistment.

A great view of these young boys, most likely taken early in their enlistment, looking as though they were off to see some great adventures. They would not look nearly this neat, tidy and innocent by the end of 1864.  [ph:L]

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