19TH CENTURY 5-FOOT SQUARE CONFEDERATE BATTLE FLAG MARKED ON HOIST BY THOMAS ALEXANDER BRANDER WHO WAS ARTILLERIST IN THE VIRGINIA ARTILLERY, ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA

$7,500.00 ON HOLD

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 1083-02

The provenance of this flag states the flag was made for Colonel Richard H. Dulany of "Welbourne", near Middleburg, Virginia. Some of Col. Dulany's items have been sold through the years.

The flag was acquired from The Powder Horn Antiques of Middleburg, Va. Robert M. Daley, the proprietor, said he had talked to Howard M. Madaus in reference this flag and that Mr. Madaus says this was a known pattern of Confederate Veteran's battle flag from an unidentified flag maker in and around Richmond, the bunting used to construct these flags was like that used in the 1861-1865 period."

Howard Michael Madaus is the author of several books on Civil War flags and until his death was the recognized "authority" on Confederate and other U.S. military flags.  His books include the following:  "The Flags of the Iron Brigade"; "The American Flag"; "The Battle Flags of the Confederate Army of Tennessee", among others.

The Horse Soldier purchased this flag from Howard M. Madaus and later sold it to another collector, from whom the most recent owner obtained it in 2004.

That "unknown maker" who made this pattern battle flag for various Confederate veterans has since been identified as the ex-Confederate artillery officer (Letcher Artillery of Virginia) Thomas A. Brander, who made the one owned now by the Virginia Military Institute, where "Stonewall" taught and R.E. Lee was president.  John Sexton and Greg Biggs, a Confederate flag historian, examined this flag at one of the Franklin, Tennessee Civil War shows and stated that only four flags made by Brander are known including the VMI flag, and this example.

Thomas A. Brander (1839 – 1900), not only was a Confederate hero commanding artillery at most of the major battles fought under Robert E. Lee including Gettysburg where a plaque commemorates his position, but was also very involved in post-war commemorations of Confederate Veterans. By the time of his death, he was Major General and Commander of the Virginia division of the United Confederate Veterans.  For reference, a scan of a CDV of Brander (which does not accompany the flag) is included in the photos below, courtesy of War Between the States Memorabilia.

This particular flag was made for an ex-Confederate Colonel Richard H. Dulany of "Welbourne" near Middleburg, Va.  His inked initials, R.H.D., are on the hoist (vertical white leading edge) and nearer the top of the hoist is inked "7th V. Cavalry".  Colonel Dulany assumed command of the 7th Va. Cav. after Colonel William E. "Grumble" Jones was promoted to Brigadier General.  "Grumble" Jones was given command after Turner Ashby, "the Black Knight of the Confederacy", was killed in battle.  The 7th Cavalry was more frequently referred to as "Ashby's Cavalry".   Another notable Confederate in this unit was Captain Harry Gilmore.

This Brander flag is a cavalry size flag as opposed to an artillery standard.  The fimbriation (that's the narrow white stripes outlining Saint Andrew's Cross) has inked in near the cross center a listing of five or so engagements the 7th fought.  The ONLY noticeable difference in this veteran's flag and an actual wartime issued flag is that the fimbriation has one line of stitching as opposed to two.  "7th" is stenciled onto the field above Saint Andrew's Cross.  "VA" is stenciled onto the field below Saint Andrew's Cross.

Here are the measurements for this flag:  Hoist - 40";  Fly - 44";  Saint Andrew's Cross - 7"  wide;  the stars are 7" across.

The following is an auction catalog description from the recent past for another of Brander’s flags, which is of a similar construction:

“This is a most unusual and perplexing flag as the materials all appear contemporaneous to the Civil War as does the machine stitch used to assemble this flag. There are only minor differences noted as to the construction of Civil War flags and this slightly later example. This cataloger is fairly certain that this flag and another that is no doubt related which was donated to VMI in 1923 as the battle flag of the Letcher Artillery and used at the battle of Newmarket. Thomas A. Brander was an officer in this unit.

The flag at the Virginia Military Museum collection is identical in construction as the flag here, though a different size 40″ x 44″, it also has the same inked inscription “T.A. Brander” on the hoist…. Most likely this flag is commemorative and not wartime, though until this flag surfaced the VMI Military Museum flag was thought to have been wartime, it is now listed in archives as commemorative. This flag has family provenance dating it back to the Brander family according to our consignor which we do not doubt. Overall dimensions are 60-1/4″ on fly 59-1/4″ on the hoist, the Saint Andrews cross is 8-3/4″ wide, the cotton stars are 6-1/2″ across. The flag is totally machine sewn with cotton hoist with sleeve retaining mounting cords that appear contemporary to its manufacture….”

The flag is loosely stitched to a piece of fabric, which can easily be undone.  [ph:L]

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