CIVIL WAR INFANTRY OFFICER’S EMBROIDERED CAP INSIGNIA

$550.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 998-653

Shipping: Determined by Method & Location of buyer

To Order:
Call 717-334-0347,
Fax 717-334-5016, or E-mail

Gold colored hunting horns with a full loop became the regulation insignia for U.S. infantry in 1851 and lasted until the adoption of crossed rifles in 1875. This is a very good example of the officer’s insignia for hat or cap, made of bullion embroidery on a colored backing. This one is still on its original square patch, indicating it was purchased by an officer but never used or remained in the inventory of a military goods dealer, many of whom had substantial inventories when the war ended and the army was drastically reduced.

The embroidery has nice color and all the strands are in place. The maker used vertical strands to indicate the open bell of the horn and an oval of sequins to indicates highlights of the rim. There is a small bit of dusty verdigris on the center left of the bell. The black background still has nice color. Depending on the dye lot and exposure many backgrounds have oxidized to brown.

Officers often supplemented these with small silvered regimental numerals inside the loop of the horn, but not always. Makers usually did not find it cost efficient to embroider the numbers since it limited the market to members of a regiment with that number. This would display well with an infantry officer’s grouping, especially with a set of shoulder straps or epaulets and sash, all required items for a newly commissioned officer to purchase.  [sr] [ph:m]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

CLICK HERE FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS.

THANK YOU!

Inquire »

Inquire About CIVIL WAR INFANTRY OFFICER’S EMBROIDERED CAP INSIGNIA

should be empty

featured item

EARLY WAR U.S. CAVALRY OFFICER’S SABER, 1840 STYLE, BY SMITH, CRANE AND COMPANY, NEW YORK, 1858 TO 1862

Smith, Crane and Company pieces are scarce. They were only in business from 1858 through 1862, retailing military goods in New York City. Their swords were imported, of German make and likely by Schnitzler and Kirschbaum, though not maker marked.… (870-263). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

21
May

June 25-26th: 49TH ANNUAL GETTYSBURG CIVIL WAR COLLECTORS' SHOW Learn More »

Instagram