CDV OF C.S. COLONEL BRADLEY T. JOHNSON, 1ST MARYLAND (CSA)

$400.00 SOLD

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Item Code: 1138-227

Bust view carte de viste of Johnson while a colonel. He wears a dark double-breasted frock with three-star collar insignia (no wreath). Image contrast is good. A period ink identification is on the lower edge of the mount. No photographer’s backmark; only some modern pencil notes.

Bradley Tyler Johnson (September 29, 1829 – October 5, 1903) was an American lawyer, soldier, and writer. Although his home state of Maryland remained in the Union during the American Civil War, Johnson owned and traded slaves, and accordingly served as a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army, leading efforts to raise a Maryland Line in the CSA, and rising to command the 1st Maryland Infantry, CSA.

At the Battle of Front Royal the 1st Maryland (CSA) was forced into battle with their fellow Marylanders, the 1st Regiment Maryland Volunteer Infantry (USA) commanded by Colonel Kenly. This is the only time in United States military history that two regiments of the same numerical designation and from the same state have engaged each other in battle. Just two days later, on May 25, 1862, the 1st Maryland fought again at the First Battle of Winchester, and at the Battle of Cross Keys on June 8, where the 1st Maryland were placed on General Ewell's left, successfully fighting off three assaults by Federal troops.

Johnson saw service in the Seven Days Battles in 1862, part of the Peninsula Campaign, a series of six major battles over the seven days from June 25 to July 1, 1862, near Richmond, Virginia, in which Confederate General Robert E. Lee drove the Union Army of the Potomac away from Richmond and into a retreat down the Virginia Peninsula.

Johnson was advanced to the rank of brigadier general of cavalry in 1864. As commander of the post at Salisbury, N.C., he used his influence to lessen the suffering among the prisoners of war and finally obtained their parole.

After the war, Johnson practiced law in Richmond until 1879, when he moved to Baltimore. After the death of his wife, he moved to Amelia, Virginia, where he died, but his remains were interred back in Baltimore in Loudon Park Cemetery.  [jet]     [ph:L]

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