UNIQUE CLAUBERG PRESENTATION CAVALRY OFFICER’S SABER

$4,500.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 870-275

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Call 717-334-0347,
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If you want to own a unique, one-of-a-kind, high-end presentation sword that is literally, “the one in the book,” this might be for you. This 1840-style cavalry officer’s saber has an etched Clauberg blade, 34.5 inches long, that includes a blade motto, and a hilt deeply cast with floral motifs and guard branches in the form of leaves and berries, or perhaps grape leaves. It also features a sharkskin grip that is bound with three strands of twisted brass wire, which is unusual, and a scabbard with profusely engraved mounts. It is elaborate and richly done, but not over-the-top. Since the hilt is unique, it could be a Clauberg product or the sword could possibly have been assembled by an American retailer on a special order. In any case, it’s a wonderful example of why Clauberg bladed swords are rated highly among collectors and are a collecting category of their own.

The edges of the pommel cap have been cast with floral elements in keeping with the branches, as has the inside of the counterguard. The knuckleguard is covered with a column of small, overlapping chevrons. The white leather washer is in place on the underside of the guard. The only fault with the grip is that it is missing the last turn of the three binding wires as they pass under the pommel cap.

Both sides of the blade have frosted and etched panels of the same design. On both sides the frosting is thin, but more than enough to render the etching very visible. An etched rectangular geometric panel sits above the ricasso. Over that are two crossed lances, points upward, bearing small flags. Beside their lower shafts is etched the motto, “Stand by the Union.” The last part of the motto is somewhat rubbed on the obverse. On the reverse it is fully legible. Over the lances is an open wreath of two branches knotted at its base, and above that a dynamic American eagle clutching arrows in its talons, holding in its beak a ribbon that floats above. The etching ends with more floral elements in pointed arch, reminiscent of a conical tent, topped with floral finial. The frosting then narrows to a point with rounded sides of decreasing width.

The obverse ricasso is blank. The reverse bears the stamped “W. / Clauberg / Solingen” maker’s stamp around their standing knight trademark. The edge and point are good. The metal above and below the etched panels is light gray and shows a few minute pockmarks.

The scabbard is steel, with intact blue. It has a narrow brass throat and elaborately engraved upper and middle wide brass carrying ring mounts and an engraved and cast drag, which are just as unique on a Clauberg product as the hilt. The engraving is a tight, geometric basket weave for the most part on the obverse, with sparser, open floral elements on the reverse. The ring bands are rounded and notched. The brass mounts overall match the hilt in a mellow, aged patina.

The upper mount is engraved on the obverse: “Presented to / Capt W. Schilling / by the members of / Co. C 4th Regt. NYSMNG” (New York State Militia National Guard,) and on the reverse with the date of the presentation: “January 12, 1863.” William Schilling had served with the regiment before the war, making First Lieutenant in 1858 and Captain in September 1861. Classified as artillery, the regiment was based in New York City. Schilling obviously was given a cavalry saber as he would serve mounted. Phisterer calls the unit heavy artillery, but in 1860 they were equipped with 13 Six-pounder bronze guns. Most national guard units never left their home states, but Schilling’s did during the Gettysburg Campaign and he went with it. As Lee’s forces pushed north the regiment was mobilized on June 18 and ordered to Harrisburg, PA, for thirty days service as infantry. It was not a pointless assignment or without risk. Confederates captured York, PA, raided Mechanicsburg, and even skirmished with Union forces at Camp Hill, just south of the capital. Schilling enrolled in the US service with his comrades on June 20 and journeyed to Harrisburg, where they served in the Department of the Susquehanna, returning to New York for muster out on July 24 after Lee crossed back into Virginia. Schilling remained Captain of the company, eventually redesignated “Battery C Artillery, First Division,” until it was disbanded in 1874.

This sword is pictured and discussed by Thillmann in “Civil War Cavalry and Artillery Sabers.” It is an impressive cavalry officer’s sword and worthy of a prominent spot in a collection. [sr]

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