REVOLUTIONARY WAR ARTILLERY CANNON WORM, LIKELY AMERICAN

$225.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 2020-908

These double-helix iron implements were among the basic tools of an artillery crew serving a muzzle-loading cannon. Swabbing out the bore with a sponge staff between shots in action was an essential part of artillery drill to extinguish any remaining embers from a cloth powder bag either by the damp wool sponge or from the effect of sealing the bore from oxygen. The worm was a necessary auxiliary tool to actually extract any residual debris from the bore, a powder bag that failed to ignite, etc.

This example is in good condition and solid, showing overall shallow pitting, but is complete a displayable. It is designed to be mounted by its simple, long base spike on the end of a staff, which would have had a ferrule on the end to prevent the wood splitting. It is very serviceable and somewhat crude, suggesting it might be an American blacksmith’s product. It measures a little over 9 inches long, including the base spike, and can compress to about three-inches in diameter, making it for a 3, 4 or possibly 6-pound field gun. Artillery implements of the period are scarce. This would look great with an artillery priming horn or excavated shot, which occasionally show up.  [sr]

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