SPEECH OF MR. J.S. BARBOUR OF VIRGINIA…ON THE PROPRIETY OF EXCLUDING THE AGENCY OF THE PRESIDENT, IN APPOINTING AND REMOVING THE DISBURSING AND ACCOUNTING OFFICERS OF THE TREASURY DEPT.

$175.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 1000-1632

Shipping: Determined by Method & Location of buyer

To Order:
Call 717-334-0347,
Fax 717-334-5016, or E-mail

(Delivered in the U.S. House of Representatives, March 1828). Published by Green & Jarvis, Washington, 1828. Title page presentation inscription, in ink: “Judge McLean with/ my respects/ J.S. Barb__. 14 pp., wraps, 8.125 x 8.25”, marbled covers. Slight wear at the extremities, lightly faded. Else VG & entirely intelligible.

James S. Barbour came from prominent Virginia stock. Both sides of his family were among the First Families of Virginia. And, during his lifetime (1775-1842) Barbour served in a number of state and federal positions commensurate with his high-born Virginia status. After serving several terms in the Virginia House of Delegates, he was elected “war-time” Governor of VA (1812), and then to the U.S. Senate, serving from 1814-25.

During this period Barbour proposed combining the bill to admit Missouri as a slave state with the bill to admit Maine as a free state, an arrangement which became the basis of the 1820 Missouri Compromise. Below is a fragment of his speech in support of admission of Missouri as a slave state which perfectly foreshadows the Southern position during the American civil War:

“Sir, no portion of the Union has been more loyal than the South. Is this your reward for our loyalty? Sir, there is a point where resistance becomes a virtue and submission a crime. Our people are as brave as they are loyal. They can endure anything but insult. But the moment you pass that Rubicon they will redeem their much abused character and throw back upon you your insolence and your aggression.”

Allied politically with John Q. Adams and Henry Clay, Barbour served as Secretary of War (1825-28) and Minister to England (1828-29), but, damaged by association with the unpopular Adams administration, he abandoned further attempts at public office, eventually becoming a Whig in support of the 1840 president-elect, William Henry Harrison.

In his final years, Barbour was described by a friend as follows: “Gov. Barbour presented an imposing appearance, with striking face, long, shaggy eyebrows, and head covered with silvery flowing locks; with a majestic and sonorous voice, he filled one’s conception of a Roman Senator in the last days of the Republic.” He died in 1842, preceded by year, by his younger brother Philip Pendleton Barbour, who served as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, 1836-41.

Fine collectible, fine memento of a prominent ante-bellum politician- aristocrat, FFV. Accompanied by documentation.  [jp]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS,

CLICK ON ‘CONTACT US’ AT THE TOP OF ANY PAGE ON THE SITE,

THEN ON ‘LAYAWAY POLICY’.

THANK YOU!

Inquire »

Inquire About SPEECH OF MR. J.S. BARBOUR OF VIRGINIA…ON THE PROPRIETY OF EXCLUDING THE AGENCY OF THE PRESIDENT, IN APPOINTING AND REMOVING THE DISBURSING AND ACCOUNTING OFFICERS OF THE TREASURY DEPT.

should be empty

featured item

VERY HIGH GRADE MODEL 1840 GENERAL OFFICER’S SWORD DAMASCENE BLADE

Damascene blade and fabulous high relief casting with intricate detail and an array of patterns and motif designs on this sword for General Officers. Manufactured: France Maker: Unmarked Year: c1851 thru 1860 Model: M1840 / 60 Size: 31 inch single… (870-349). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

09
Apr

The shop is currently closed but we're working from home. E-mail or call with questions or orders! Learn More »