MODEL 1860 COLT ARMY MADE IN 1862 AND WITH A SHENANDOAH VALLEY PROVENANCE

$2,250.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 809-91

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This 1860 Colt Army revolver is serial number 46956, giving it an 1862 date of manufacture, and comes from the Shenandoah Valley estate of the Brock family, for whom Brock’s Gap is named, near Fisher Hill. Brock’s Gap was the scene of a cavalry fight in October 6, 1864 between George Custer and his old West Point classmate Tom Rosser. The pistol had been in the family for generations and the location gives it the distinct possibility of being a battlefield pick-up by a member of the family.

The pistol has all matching serial numbers, including the wedge. The Colt’s Patent frame stamp is sharp, as is the barrel address, with just some very small checks along its bottom edge. The metal is smooth gray overall mixed with smaller dark gray areas and some brown coming up, but no significant pitting. There are visible small sub-inspector initials forward of the cylinder and elsewhere. The cylinder scene is present, but faint. The cylinder stamps, however, are sharp, both the Colts Patent and serial number, and the smaller patent date beneath. The action is tight and locks up crisply, but several of the nipples are broken off, likely from kids in the family dry-firing it over the years. The lower back of the hammer shows a touch of color. The backstrap is smooth metal with no pitting and shows some plum brown. The grips are good, tight to the metal, with just minor handling marks and wear. There is a wear spot at the lower left grip leaving just a hint of a cartouche, but the right shows a crisp inspector’s stamp. The bottom of the butt has a couple of small dings and one narrow gouge, but the buttstrap, like the backstrap is smooth metal and has some color.

This is a good example of the typical U.S. cavalry sidearm that was also used by Confederate troopers when the opportunity offered. It would make a good addition to a cavalry collection and has a legitimate connection to the Shenandoah Valley, which was the scene of many cavalry actions, particularly in 1864.  [sr]

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