EMBROIDERED HAT INSIGNIA & GAR ITEMS ID’D TO OFFICER CAPTURED AT GETTYSBURG

$795.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 1070-162

The items in this little group are identified to 1st Lieutenant George W. Grant of the 88th Pennsylvania who was captured at Gettysburg on July1, 1863.

The lot consists of an embroidered Infantry hunting horn insignia done in gold bullion thread and gold sequins with a bugle cord done in twisted gold bullion. The backing is the usual black felt cut into an oval with a dead bullion border. The bullion and thread have darkened from age and use and show a nice patina. A few of the sequins located around the edge of the bugles bell are missing but if you did not know they should be there you would not miss them. The dead bullion border also shows light wear but is complete. The felt backing is also very good.

The reverse of the item is in excellent condition with all the threads still intact. A nice old late 19th, early 20th Century printed label is attached to the back and reads “CAP INSIGNIA OF MAJOR GEORGE W. GRANT 88TH PA. VET. VOLS.” With the insignia is a nice color copy print of the label. When the insignia is displayed above the copy print it allows the front of be seen and the paper label can still be read and appreciated by viewers.

Also in the group is a 5.50 x 1.00 inch white ribbon with “PENNSYLVANIA “ in blue block letters.

The last item is one of Lt. Grant’s GAR calling cards. It has a full color GAR Past Post Commander’s badge along the left side over “7TH PA. VOLS (3 MOS.) 88TH PA. VET. VOLS.” At center is Grant’s name done in cursive and probably meant to represent his signature. The top of the card has small lettering that reads “GEO. N. MORGAN POST No. 4” and below Grant’s name is “BATTLE OF ATLANTA, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.” Card is gold edged and in nice condition. It is blank on the reverse.

With the items is a nice oval reproduction print of Grant in his GAR uniform. Image size is approx. 5.00 x 6.00 inches. Again, this is a copy photo, not an original.

All items are housed in a black display box with affixed plastic labels that read “1ST LT. GEORGE W. GRANT 88TH PENNSYLVANIA VOL. INAFNTRY, CO. B.” The label then lists Grant’s promotions from Sergeant to 1st Lieutenant, his capture at Gettysburg and his discharge date.

George W. Grant was born in Pennsylvania in 1843 and by the start of the Civil War was working as a machinist in Reading.

Grant enlisted as a Private in Company G, 7th Pennsylvania Infantry for three months at Harrisburg on April 23, 1861. After service in western Virginia he was mustered out on July 27, 1861.

On September 12, 1861 Grant enlisted again, this time as 1st Sergeant of Company B, 88th Pennsylvania Infantry. The regiment was eventually assigned to the 3rd Corps of the Army of Virginia and suffered heavily at Second Bull Run losing 19 killed, 19 wounded and 1 man captured.

With the dissolution of the Army of Virginia the 88th was assigned to the 1st Corps of the Army of the Potomac and fought with that organization at Antietam where they again suffered heavily losing 13 killed, 55 wounded and 1 man missing. Records show that Grant was present until September 23, 1862 when he became ill and reported to the hospital. He was back on duty by early November and now held a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in his Company.

Grant was present for the fight at Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862 and went into winter quarters with his regiment.

When campaigning season began in April of 1863 Grant found himself a 1st Lieutenant in command of his Company and given a 10-day furlough. On his return he went with his Company through the fight at Chancellorsville where they were lightly engaged.

During the grueling marches of the Gettysburg Campaign Grant was present alongside his men all the way. During the fighting on the first day of the battle of Gettysburg Grant and the 88th fought along Oak Ridge helping to repulse Iverson’s Confederate Brigade. Once the Union line was flanked and the 88th was forced to retreat, Grant became separated and made his way into town. While in the area of the present-day Farnsworth House restaurant, just short of his goal on Cemetery Hill, Grant stuck his head out from around the corner of a building and found himself staring down the barrel of a Confederate musket. Being armed only with a sword, which was still in its sheath, he surrendered and was sent South where he was confined at Macon, Georgia and Columbia, South Carolina. While in the latter prison Grant attempted an escape but was recaptured.

Grant remained a prisoner until being paroled on March 1, 1865. Upon his arrival at Camp Parole in Maryland he was given a furlough. He was found to be unfit for further service and was mustered out on April 25, 1865.

After his muster out Grant returned to Reading, Pennsylvania where he married and worked for a time on the railroad and later served as postmaster and also ran a novelty store. Sadly, his wife Pamela died in 1870 and this, combined with his time in Southern prisons, had broken his health to the point where he could barely work.

In the meantime, Grant had remarried but this second marriage ended in divorce in 1881. He married a third time in September of 1895 and had one son. This marriage would last until Grant’s death.

Grant moved his family to Minnesota where he collected a pension and took a job as Quartermaster of the Minnesota State Soldiers Home. He then suffered a stroke making him totally unfit for any work. Appeals to the Pension Department for an increase went nowhere causing Grant’s wife to write President McKinley who referred the matter back to the Pension Office.

George Grant died of heart disease at the Minnesota State Soldier’s Home on April 11, 1901 and is buried in Minneapolis’ Lakewood Cemetery.

Full military and pension records come with the item.  [SR/AD]


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