SPECTACULAR PORTRAIT, PRESIDENTIAL COMMISSION AND EBONY WALKING STICK ID TO BVT. BRIG. GENERAL DAVID H. VINTON

$3,000.00 SOLD
Originally $3,500.00

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 740-825

David Hammond Vinton was born May 4, 1803 in Providence, Rhode Island.

Vinton attended the West Point Military Academy from September 1, 1818 to July 1, 1822 where he graduated 14th in his class. He was commissioned in the Army as a 2nd Lieutenant of the 4th Artillery to date from July 1, 1822.

He served on Ordnance duty from August 21, 1822 to June 10, 1823. On March 19, 1823 he was transferred to the 6th Infantry. After finishing with Ordnance duty he went on Recruiting service after which he became a part of the garrison at Fort Atkinson, Iowa from 1823 to 1825. While at Fort Atkinson Vinton was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on April 7, 1825. From September 28, 1825 to April 27, 1826 he was again on Ordnance duty. On March 24, 1826 he was transferred to the 3rd Artillery in the garrison at Ft. Monroe where he took part in the Artillery School for Practice. In 1828 Vinton was sent to Fort Independence, Massachusetts. He served in that garrison to 1831 when he was once again assigned to Ordnance duty from March 31, 1831 to December 31, 1833. In 1834 Vinton joined the garrison at Ft. Monroe, Virginia and was assigned to Engineer duty from December 1834 to August of 1835. He remained at Fort Monroe until some point in late 1835 when he took part in the Creek and Florida War. Vinton served on Quartermaster duty as Assistant Quartermaster from October 19, 1836 to July 7, 1838 and being Quartermaster-General of the Territory of Florida from November 27, 1837 to July 2, 1838. Five days later, on July 7th Vinton was promoted to Captain in the 3rd Artillery. He continued on Quartermaster duty on the Northern Frontier during the Canadian Border Disturbances, at Brownsville, New York from 1839 to1840, at Sackett's Harbor, New York in 1840 and in Detroit, Michigan from 1841 to1842.Captain Vinton worked on settling accounts at Brownsville, New York from 1842 to 1843 and then went on Quartermaster duty at Fort Johnston, North Carolina. Later that same year (1843) he was assigned to Sackett's Harbor and Buffalo, New York.

At the outbreak of the Mexican War Captain Vinton was in New York City making shipments to the army in Mexico. On March 3, 1847 he was promoted to Major and Chief Quartermaster on the Staff of Major General Wool, and on June 21, 1849 for the Pacific Division a position he held until January 11, 1850. The year 1851 found the Major in Boston on Quartermaster duty and from 1852-1856 he was Chief Quartermaster of the Department of the West with headquarters at St. Louis, Missouri. In1857 Vinton was transferred to the Department of Texas with headquarters in San Antonio. On August 3, 1861 he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in the Quartermaster General Department. He was taken prisoner by the Rebels and put upon parole. During the Civil War Vinton served as Chief Quartermaster at New York City where he was in charge of the depot for supplying the army with clothing and equipage. He held this post from June 28, 1861 to Sep. 5, 1867 and was promoted Brevet Colonel and Brevet Brigadier General on March 13, 1865 for faithful and meritorious services during the Rebellion. He retired from active service on July 29, 1866 under the Law of July 17, 1862, he being over "the Age of 62 Years." Vinton worked on settling his accounts from September 5, 1867 to February 21, 1870.

He died on February 21, 1873 at Stamford, Connecticut at the age of 70. He is buried in Swan Point Cemetery, Providence, Rhode Island.

The first item in this group is Vinton’s Presidential commission appointing him a Captain in the 3rd Artillery in 1839. The commission is in what appears to be its original wood frame with wood slate backing. Framed the document meas. approx. 22.75 x 26.50 inches. The frame is walnut with a white mat. The top of the frame has a jagged closed crack and the wood slat backing has stained the mat however the document itself looks to be fine. The commission is the standard Regular Army Presidential commission with the spread winged eagle at top and panoply of flags at bottom. The text is pre-printed with the name and rank filled in with ink. The bottom of the document bears the signature of President Martin Van Buren. The President’s signature is strong but not bold. Secretary of War Joel R. Poinsett signed in a bolder light blue ink. All other ink inscriptions are readable and the paper seal is still attached to the upper left corner. The document does not have any fold seams and is in very good condition overall.

Next in the group is an ebony walking stick with a gold knob at top. The walking stick meas. approx. 35.00 inches long. The bottom end is missing the finial but the top has a very ornate gold knob. The sides and top of the knob are engraved with a scrollwork and floral design while the face is finely engraved with “TO BVT. MAJOR D. H. VINTON, USA, JAN. 1ST 1856.” The body of the walking stick shows light wear while the gold knob is clean and near perfect.

The last item in the group is a wonderful large portrait of Vinton while serving on General Wool’s staff. The portrait is oil on canvas and meas. approx. 24.00 x 29.00 inches and comes in the original frame. The frame is faced with gold gilt paint and the edges have applied plaster scroll decoration also painted gold. The frame is 34.50 inches wide x 39.50 inches tall x 3.00 inches deep. The frame is in very good condition for its age. There is a small chip in the top edge which is not visible when the painting is hung unless you are above it looking down on the top. This chip meas. approx. 1.50 x 0.75 of an inch. The bottom also has a small chip and some light wear as does the lower left corner. The wood stretcher to which the painting is attached looks to be newer than the rest of the frame. The painting itself depicts Vinton in the 1833 blue  dress coat with a high braided collar and brush epaulettes. On his right shoulder he wears the white aiguillette of a Staff Officer. The surface of the painting is dirty and needs cleaning. The overcoat of varnish has crackled which is common on oil paintings of this age. There is no paint loss and no damage of any kind to the canvas. After a good cleaning there is no doubt that this painting will really come to life. The canvas is not signed.

This is a first class group identified to an officer who dedicated his life to faithful service of the United States. Aside from his time on General Wool’s staff most of the duty Vinton performed was mundane and was for him a labor of love for his Country. Officers like him rarely get the glory but armies cannot do what they do without dedicated men like Vinton.  [AD]

EXTRA SHIPPING REQUIRED.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS,

CLICK ON ‘CONTACT US’ AT THE TOP OF ANY PAGE ON THE SITE,

THEN ON ‘LAYAWAY POLICY’.

THANK YOU!

Inquire About SPECTACULAR PORTRAIT, PRESIDENTIAL COMMISSION AND EBONY WALKING STICK ID TO BVT. BRIG. GENERAL DAVID H. VINTON

should be empty

featured item

US NAVAL SURGEON’S SWORD, C1820-1830

Manufactured: Unknown  Maker: Unknown  Year: 1820-1830  Model: Naval Surgeon Sword Size: 25.75  Condition: VG Great early naval surgeon sword.  Guard has high grade casting on knucklebow, pommel and has anchor langets.  Guard retains a fair… (870-11). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

13
Dec