SEATED VIEW OF 2ND NEW HAMPSHIRE COLONEL GILMAN MARSTON

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Item Code: 2020-503

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CDV image of Marston seated wearing a dark civilian suit with black felt collar and dark military vest open to reveal a white shirt and black bowtie.

Image has excellent clarity and contrast. Edges of the mount and paper have light wear and surface dirt. Bottom center is marked WHIPPLE… BOSTON.

Reverse has period pencil ID and the scrap of an old newspaper stuck to the back.

Gilman Marston was born in Oxford, New Hampshire on August 20, 1811. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1837 and from Harvard Law in 1840. He practiced law in Exeter, New Hampshire, in 1841 and was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1845 to 1849. He was also a delegate to the State constitutional convention of 1850.

Marston was elected to the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses (March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1863). He was a Republican and a strong supporter of President Abraham Lincoln.

Marston was appointed as colonel of the 2nd New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry on June 4, 1861. He led the regiment at First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861. His arm was shattered, but he refused an amputation. After he recovered, he served in the Peninsula Campaign, Second Bull Run, and Fredericksburg.

Marston was promoted to brigadier general of U.S. volunteers, effective November 29, 1862. Prior to the Chancellorsville campaign, he was relieved from duty with the Army of the Potomac and assigned to the defenses of Washington where he returned to his seat in Congress. After Gettysburg, Marston established a prison camp in Maryland known as Point Lookout. In 1864, he commanded a brigade in the 18th Corps during the Bermuda Hundred Campaign. He took part in a disastrous assault on Cold Harbor, where his brigade suffered heavy casualties. At Petersburg, Gilman assumed command of the 1st Division, 18th Corps. Thereafter he commanded the Union troops on the north side of the James River with his headquarters located at Fort Pocahontas. Occasionally he returned to command of the 1st Division. Having been re-elected to Congress he resigned 1865, whereupon he received the thanks of the state of New Hampshire.

He was elected to the Thirty-ninth Congress (March 4, 1865–March 3, 1867) and in 1870 declined the Governorship of Idaho Territory. He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1876 to the Forty-fifth Congress.

On March 4, 1889, Marston was appointed to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy in the term commencing on that date and served until June 18, 1889, when a successor was elected. He died in Exeter on July 3, 1890. He is buried in Exeter Cemetery.  [ad]

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