FULL STANDING CDV OF 4TH NEW HAMPSHIRE COLONEL

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Item Code: 1054-2119

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Image shows Colonel Thomas Jefferson Whipple posed in a slight left profile cradling a cavalry saber in his left arm. He wears a dark double-breasted frock coat with matching trousers. At his waist is a sword belt with rectangular plate and sash. He also wears leather gauntlets on each hand.

Photo has good clarity and contrast. Paper and mount are good.

Reverse has photographer’s imprint for KIMBALL & SONS…CONCORD, N.H. There is also collector information in pencil. ID is confirmed by other on-line images.

The history of the 4th New Hampshire has a succinct biography of Colonel Whipple;

“Thomas J. Whipple was born in Wentworth, N.H. Jan. 30, 1816. His father Dr. Thomas Whipple, was a well-known physician of Northern New Hampshire, and served in the U.S. House of Representatives. Col. Whipple was educated at Bradford, Vt, and the Norwich Military University, read law with Hon. Josiah Quincy of Rumney and Salmon Waires of Johnson, Vt., and was admitted to the bar in 1840, settled at Wentworth, afterwards removing to Meredith Bridge, now Laconia, where all of his life was passed, excepting while in the service of his country.

He was commissioned as First Lieutenant of the Ninth U.S. Infantry, April 9, 1847, and was soon made Adjutant. He was taken prisoner at Vera Cruz, Mexico, was afterwards exchanged and distinguished himself at the battle of Atlixco. Adjutant Whipple resigned Feb. 23, 1848, afterwards served in the New Hampshire State Militia. When the rebellion broke out he was practicing law at Laconia. He at once offered his service to Gov. Goodwin, who appointed him Lieutenant Col. First Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers, April 29, 1861. He was mustered out Aug. 9, and Aug. 20, was commissioned Col. Fourth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers. He had the honor of commanding the regiment which was first to land on South Carolina soil after the state had seceded.

Col. Whipple was a model soldier, strict in discipline, but kind and considerate to his men, who admired his military abilities, respected and loved him as their leader and deeply regretted his departure, caused by resignation, March 18, 1862, at Jacksonville, Fla.

After the war he practiced law at Laconia, where he became one of the leading lawyers of New Hampshire.

Col. Whipple died of paralysis, at his home in Laconia, Dec. 21 1889, aged 73 years, 10 months, and 21 days, universally lamented by his comrades and all that knew him.”

He is buried in Union Cemetery, Laconia, New Hampshire.     [ad]

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