“IN MEMORIAM OF GETTYSBURG 1863” SILVER PLATE GOBLET

$250.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 179-1079

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This silver-plated goblet measures 6 ½ inches tall and 3 ½ inches in diameter across the top. The goblet has nice, undisturbed patina and no dents or damage. The face is engraved with a wreath of two long stems with flowers, crossed at the bottom, bowing out and then curving inward toward the top. In the middle is engraved in script, “Miss Anna Windle / In memoriam of / Gettysburg 1863” with arcs and floral flourishes.

Anna Estella Windle (her middle initial appearing in some records as “S” for “Stella”) was born in 1868. Her father, Thomas Hayes Windle (1833-1907) saw two tours of service. He enlisted first in the 97th PA and mustered into the regimental band as a 3rd Class Musician for three years 10/28/61. The regiment left the state in November 1861 and was sent to Port Royal, S.C. During his time with the unit, they took part in an expedition to Fernandina and Jacksonville, FL., then returned to Hilton Head Island in March 1862 and in April moved to Edisto Island, where he was discharged for disability 5/26/62 at Fort Edisto. He returned to Pennsylvania and is listed in the June 1863 draft registers as 30-year-old married farmer in Chester County.

As Lee headed north in June 1863 Windle reenlisted in the emergency troops summoned by the Governor of Pennsylvania, joining Captain Myers’ Company of PA Independent Militia Cavalry, nicknamed the “Continental Troop,” on June 16 at Coatesville. The company then marched 87 miles to Harrisburg where it mustered into service June 20. Service details are scarce, but at least one member of the company is listed as captured at Oyster Point, “in skirmish on Sunday Afternoon June 28th 1863.” This marked the farthest advance of Confederate troops toward Harrisburg. General Albert Jenkins led two Virginia cavalry regiments and a section of artillery that skirmished with Union militia in the area of modern Camp Hill. Confederates were able to determine the next day that state capital was vulnerable to assault by Ewell’s corps, but Lee’s orders to concentrate at Gettysburg prevented any follow up. Myers’ cavalry company continued to serve until July 31, when they mustered out in the wake of Lee’s return to Virginia.

Thomas Windle lived until 1907 and his daughter until 1952. A Civil War drum sold by a descendant in 2015 had a family history of having been retrieved from the battlefield by Windle while acting as a “civilian volunteer.” His service in Meyers’ company during the campaign, however, is well documented. No date or occasion is given for the presentation of the cup, but it seems likely Windle might have presented it to his daughter on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the battle as a memento of his service in the campaign.  [sr]

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