RED, WHITE, AND BLUE ENAMELED 10th ARMY CORPS BADGE

$550.00 ON HOLD

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 480-192

This is a very pretty example of a veteran’s corps badge for a member of the 10th Army Corps. Made in the form of a four-bastioned fort, this insignia was officially adopted 25 July 1864, but was being used as early as May. The corps had been created in September 1862 from troops in South Carolina and Georgia and operated against Charleston. In 1864 it transferred to the Army of the James, taking part in actions at Bermuda Hundred, Drewry’s Bluff, and Cold Harbor in cooperation with the Army of the Potomac. It was disbanded in December 1864, with contingents going into the 24th and 25th Corps, and was briefly reorganized in March 1865 and before being formally discontinued in August.

The badge has a white enamel ground, bordered with a narrow blue stripe and edged with gold. The center has smaller gold bordered version of the bastioned fort in red. The badge is in excellent condition, with no chipping to the enamel. The arms, or bastions of the fort, were decorated with an inset diamonds or rubies. These were removed long ago, but can be replaced. The reverse has the base of a small T-bar pin in place on the reverse, and a complete, somewhat bigger, T-bar pin fully intact. The larger pin may have been for a ribbon.

The bonds forged among veterans from four years of war lasted a life time and badges of their old organizations were proudly worn for decades thereafter.  [sr]

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