CS ENLISTED CAVALRY SABER AND SCABBARD BY MARSHALL OR KRAFT, GOLDSCHMIDT AND KRAFT

$8,500.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 870-565

Swords and scabbards of this pattern may be seen in several public collections, such the Wray Collection in the Atlanta History Center. Albaugh attributed them to to Kraft, Goldschmidt and Kraft of Columbia, SC. Although in recent years a few have put forward Hammond Marshall and Company of Atlanta as rival candidates, the K.G. & K attribution has held up, largely due to the brass ferrule on the grip, the untwisted grip wire, and the long, straight blade, somewhat like the British M1853 saber blade, which on this example measures 34 ½ inches.

Swords of this pattern may be seen in several collections, in including the Wray Collection in the Atlanta History Center. The brass hilt is a simplified copy of the US light cavalry saber, with rudimentary Phrygian cap pommel with dome and brim, and knucklebow with two side branches leading forward to the counterguard, which is finished, but flat. The side branches are rounded in the mid-section but become flat at the guard. The grip is fairly straight, has a brass ferrule at the guard, is wrapped with brown leather and bound with a simple single strand of iron wire. The wire is complete and tight, dark in color. The leather has scattered wear spots with some loss of finish and one spot near the guard showing the underlying wood, but has generally good color and has not been treated with any polish or preservatives. The brass has a nice, untouched, even patina. The pommel cap and peened tang are good, the thin brown leather blade pad is in place under the guard and shows just a few rubs. The blade is very nice, with good edge and point, no nicks, smooth metal, a muted silver in color with just thin gray age spots.

The wood scabbard is typical for this saber and shows up as well on swords by B. Douglas, also of Columbia, supporting the K.G. & K. identification and suggesting one maker may have been supplying the other. A local source common to the two is also possible, as is one further afield: five hundred and fifty-six wood scabbards are known to have been supplied to the CS Arsenal at Charleston in 1863 by Lewis L. and T.R. Moore, possibly of Atlanta. Whoever made them, they are a tribute to Confederate material shortages and ingenuity. Two wood slats were mortised to receive a blade, joined together by pins, and painted with red varnish. They were bound with three black-painted tinned sheet iron mounts fitted with brass throat, ring bands and drag. The scabbards have naturally loose tolerances for the blades, making them perfect for use on swords by different makers. The scabbard is complete and shows a very nice, light reddish-tan color and finish to the wood with very few handling marks. The mounts are very good and show about 90 percent of their black paint with just small losses and some rubbing on high points.

This is a great example of a classic Confederate cavalry saber in very nice condition that would be hard to equal.  [sr] [ph:L]

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