REVOLUTIONARY WAR BRITISH PATTERN 1769 SHORT LAND MUSKET WITH INTACT UNIT FRACTION MARKED WRISTPLATE

$4,500.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 2022-602

This is a good example of the typical British infantry weapon of the American Revolution- the 1769 Pattern Short Land Musket. Sometimes still called the Second Model by collectors, this has the early version of the pattern using the single-screw 1755 pattern lock, which was standard until replaced by the two-screw 1777 pattern. It has been professionally reconverted to its original flintlock configuration had restoration to the forestock, but it not only retains very good lock markings and barrel proofs, but has vestiges of the storekeeper’s mark on the right butt flat and very clear rack numbers on the thumbpiece/wristplate, “7/11,” indicating issue within a regiment’s 7th Company to a private numbered 11. These markings are fairly scarce since the plates were subject to wear from handling and cleaning for reissue.

The lockplate markings are also very good, showing just a bit of wear to the upper left of the crown from hammer wear. The metal is smooth and the plate shows only minor shallow pitting below and slightly forward of the touch hole, a natural spot for corrosion from firing percussion caps on a drum-bolster side lug, a typically early American alteration to keep a formerly military arm usable. An additional indication the musket served here and remained here are a set of lightly carved owner initials that seem to read “E F” in a typical straight-forward early American hand.

The lockplate fits the wood very well, confirming it is original to the musket. The same is true for the buttplate, sideplate, triggerguard, and barrel. The breechplug tang still shows the small crown stamp and the barrel proofs are fully visible and centered along the barrel as is correct for an early musket. The baluster ring grooves are a bit soft, which is common, but the metal is generally very good, with smooth surface and an even brown patina.

The side plate is the correct, long, flat S-shaped plate. See Goldstein and Mowbray for discussion about how this is the original pattern used on these muskets from the very beginning as parts began to come in starting in 1769 and the muskets began to be set up. Not only does the sideplate have a good fit, the edges to the side flat are quite good also.

We do see some wear to the ramrod channel just forward of the rear entry pipe, which then becomes more regular. The ramrod pipes and other hardware forward of this are correct, but replacement copies and we expect the forestock itself was removed from that point by its later American owner for handier use around the farm though it shows some scratches and small dings, and matches about perfectly, as do the brass thimbles, nose piece, and iron sling swivels. The ramrod is correct, but most likely a replacement as well. The bayonet lug is in place.

About 88,000 of this pattern were produced until the introduction of the 1777 pattern lock, so if you are looking for a Revolutionary War British Brown Bess with a much better than even chance of actually having been used here this is a very good candidate and fairly priced.  [sr] [ph:L]

DISCLAIMER: All firearms are sold as collector's items only - we do not accept responsibility as to the shooting safety or reliability of any antique firearm. All firearms are described as accurately as possible, given the restraints of a catalog listing length. We want satisfied customers & often "under" describe the weapons. Any city or state regulations regarding owning antique firearms are the responsibility of the purchaser. All firearms are "mechanically perfect" unless noted, but again, are NOT warranted as safe to fire.

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