CONFEDERATE STATES RECEIPT PICKED UP BY GEORGE W. MOWERS, 21st PA CAVALRY & 87th PA INFANTRY

$75.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 2020-04

Shipping: Determined by Method & Location of buyer

To Order:
Call 717-334-0347,
Fax 717-334-5016, or E-mail

Dated “1862/ Aug. 2.” Handwritten receipt for “$3.00” in ink, on yellowing paper, 6 x 6.5”. Exhibits fold-marks, three vertical, w/one section detached. Fragile but, mostly legible. Text:

“The Confederate States/ To F.T. Me____ / For Both P___ & repairing wagons/ $.300/ I certify, a ____,  that the above account is correct & ____  that the services were ___ ___ ___ & that they were necessary for the public / Wm. H.T  acting Capt. & aqm ___ CSA.   Received the 15th Aug. 1862 of Wm. H. T___ Capt. &  aqm CSA. The sum of three dollars in full of the above account.  F.T. M_____”.

This document was picked up by Union soldier George W. Mowers and is from a group of Civil War material gathered him, while in service in the 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry and 87th Pennsylvania Infantry, and preserved until recently in the family when we were lucky enough to purchase the entire archive. Mowers lived in Fayetteville, PA, in close proximity to Gettysburg, along the Chambersburg Pike on the line of Confederate advance on July 1 and retreat on July 4. He gathered items from Gettysburg, at least one piece from Antietam, and one likely from the Petersburg campaign, but he brought home some of his own gear and possessions as well.

George Mowers was born 27 December 1844, the son of David and Sarah Ritter Mowers.  In 1860 the family is listed as living in Greene Township of Franklin County, with a post office address of Fayetteville. David Mowers listed as a wagon-maker and George followed in his footsteps, appearing in the 1870 census as a wagonmaker as well, and referenced in his pension file as having taken over the estate from his father, which consisted of a small farm, but also “a blacksmith and wheel-wright shop.”

Mowers did two tours of duty, his first just a few months after his eighteenth birthday, when he enrolled at Chambersburg on 7/11/63 and mustered in as a private at Harrisburg on 7/15/63 in Co. D of the 21st Pennsylvania Cavalry. This regiment was organized during the Gettysburg Campaign, being recruited under the President’s call of June 15, 1863, militia to be called up for six months’ service. After being equipped and mounted at Harrisburg the regiment was sent to Chambersburg for training and in late August several companies were sent to Scranton and Pottsville, one company to Gettysburg, and the remainder, Mower’s company among them, were sent to Harpers Ferry, where they served in the Department of the Shenandoah. Mowers is recorded as present in the company muster rolls for its entire period of service from 7/15/63 to his muster out on 2/20/64.

Mowers reenlisted a little over a year later, signing up in late February 1865 and mustering in on 3/17/65 as a sergeant in Co. K of the 87th Pennsylvania, part of the 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment had suffered heavy losses and been reduced to a battalion of five companies. Mowers was part of five new companies that joined the regiment in March to bring it back up to strength. During his service in the 87th it took part in the final assault on Petersburg on April 2, 1865, losing 2 officers and 6 enlisted men killed, 3 officers and 22 enlisted men wounded and 5 enlisted men missing (OR.) The regiment was also engaged in the pursuit of Lee, losing one man wounded at Sailors Creek on April 6. After the surrender at Appomattox the regiment moved to Burkeville Station, and from there on April 23 to Danville, arriving there on April 27. On May 16, after the surrender of Johnston, the regiment moved by rail to Manchester, where there was opportunity to visit Richmond. From there it marched to Washington starting on May 24, but Mowers was hospitalized on May 23 and was discharged on a surgeon’s certificate 29 June 1865, the day the regiment was mustered out. He returned to Franklin County, married, fathered four children and died there 28 January 1895, aged 50. He is buried in the Union Cemetery in Fayetteville.  [jp/ld]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS,

CLICK ON ‘CONTACT US’ AT THE TOP OF ANY PAGE ON THE SITE,

THEN ON ‘LAYAWAY POLICY’.

Inquire »

Inquire About CONFEDERATE STATES RECEIPT PICKED UP BY GEORGE W. MOWERS, 21st PA CAVALRY & 87th PA INFANTRY

should be empty

featured item

DUG ID TAG FOR JOSEPH FAGAN OF THE 1ST MARYLAND INFANTRY US

Stamped brass tag with a patriotic shield on the front with a riband that reads “UNION” and surrounded by “AGAINST REBELLION 1861.” Face still retains some gilt. Reverse is stamped “JOSEPH FAGAN CO. G 1ST MD. VOL US.” Joseph Fagan was a… (1000-1835). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

18
Sep
Instagram