LOT OF IMAGES ID’D TO THE HUTCHINSON FAMILY OF VIRGINIA WHO SERVED THE CONFEDERACY – ONE CAPTURED IN PICKETT’S CHARGE AND TWO OTHERS RODE WITH MOSBY

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Item Code: 2023-2596

This group contains images of three different members of the Hutchinson family whose service is spread over several Confederate regiments.

The first part of the group contains three images of Joshua M. Hutchison who served in both the 8th Virginia Infantry and Mosby’s Cavalry.

The first is a wartime bust view CDV of Joshua in a dark military shell jacket with a light-colored bowtie. Contrast is good but the clarity is just a bit on the granny side. Paper and mount have light surface dirt. Reverse has no photographer’s imprint but does have a modern pencil ID that reads “YOUNG JOSH M. HUTCHISON.”

The next image of Joshua is a late 19th Century/early 20th Century tintype of him as an old man. He is pictured from the waist-up holding a bowler in front of him with his left hand and wearing a light-colored suit with white shirt and a tie to match. The image is flaking in areas including the top of the subject’s head and forehead. Image is housed in a floral printed frame. Reverse has a plain white paper backing with a ball point pen ID of “PAPA” and “J.M.H.” There is also a modern pencil ID of “JOSH. M. HUTCHISON CIVIL WAR VET.”

The third image is an early 1900’s snapshot of Joshua Hutchison with his wife and an unknown younger man. Contrast and clarity are very good. Image meas. approx. 4.50 x 3.00 inches. Reverse is marked in modern pencil “JOSH M. HUTCHISON + WIFE MARTHA MATHEWS HUTCHISON MAN ON RIGHT (?)”

Joshua M. Hutchison was born in Fairfax County, Virginia on September 23, 1842. He enlisted for 1 year as a private in Company G, 8th Virginia Infantry at Centreville on July 17, 1861. At the time he is described as 5’ 7” tall, with light complexion, light hair, and blue eyes. He was detailed to guard the baggage train but became ill in April of 1862 and was sent to the General Hospital at Petersburg, Virginia where he remained until August 8, 1862. Released to return to duty he rejoined the baggage guard at Gordonsville where he deserted on August 29, 1862.

Hutchison next shows up as a paroled prisoner from John S. Mosby’s command. His parole shows that he served with Company H and was captured n April 25, 1865. When he joined Mosby’s command is not known.

In 1885 Joshua married to Martha Mankin and the couple would have 5 children. He died at the home of his daughter in Lyon Park, Virginia on January 29, 1931 at age 88. He is buried in Chestnut Grove Cemetery, at Herndon, Virginia.

In 1930 Joshua filed for a pension from the state of Virginia. In that pension document he claims he was wounded at Ball’s Bluff. After Joshua’s death, his wife also filled out a state of Virginia pension form in which she states her husband served through the war and was wounded at Ball’s Bluff.

The next image in the group is a cabinet card photo mounted on gray stock and is a chest-up view of an older, white bearded gentleman wearing a dark suit. It is identified on the reverse in modern pen as “UNCLE CUD” with “HUTCHISON” written in modern pencil. Contrast and clarity are good but the paper and mount have moderate surface dirt and some foxing. Item meas. approx. 7.00 x 9.00 inches.

The subject identified as Lycurgus Emory Hutchison, also known as “Crug.” He was born in Loudon County, Virginia on January 1, 1835. He enlisted on June 10, 1863 and was sworn in by John S. Mosby at Rector's Crossroads. He was captured April 27th, 1863 with Thomas N. Green and Ranger Thompson near Aldie, Fauquier County, Va. He was paroled and exchanged around May 19th, 1863. He was present during the raid on a sutler's wagon train on November 14th, 1863, near Fairfax Court-House. He also got his share of the "loot" from the "Greenback Raid" on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad train near Duffield Station, Jefferson County, W.Va, on October 14th, 1864. He was paroled April 22nd, 1865 at Winchester at the age of 30. He is listed as having fair complexion, dark hair, and blue eyes, standing 5' 10". After the war, he resided at Herndon, Virginia.

After the war he was in the mercantile business in Loudon County. Crug married a Miss Sarah Elizabeth “Betty” Benton and the couple would have 10 children.

He died at age 90 on August 17, 1924 when he was run down by a passing automobile. At the time, he was considered one of the oldest Masons in Northern, Virginia. He is buried in Chestnut Grove Cemetery in Herndon, Virginia.

It should be said that comparing the image offered here to images of “Crug” found on ancestry.com, the match is not perfect. The image in this group looks more like Joshua Hutchinson and may have been misidentified by the family.

Next is a Civil War period albumen taken by Addis Gallery in Washington, D.C. Image is a chest-up view of a young gentleman wearing a light-colored suit with a dark fur collar on the jacket. Contrast and clarity are good but there is some water staining along the right edge and light to moderate surface dirt. Reverse has a canceled 5 cents internal revenue stamp at center. Top edge has “PAPA’S BROTHER” in modern ink while below it is “UNCLE ? HUTCHISON” in modern pen and “PICTURE” in modern pencil. Also, below this in modern pencil is “EITHER JAMES (DIED POINT LOOKOUT PRISON MD.

James L. Hutchison was born in Virgnia in 1835. He enlisted as a private in Company G, 8th Virginia Infantry at Centreville on July 16, 1861. Sometime in early 1862 he was absent without leave for 37 days. When he returned, he was court-martialed and found guilty. The roles for September and October of 1862 show him forfeiting one months pay.

James remained present with his company until June 17, 1863 when he was once again listed as absent without leave having been left behind on the march near Piedmont, Virgnia. Once he rejoined his Company, he was present for the battle of Gettysburg where he was captured on July 3, 1863 during Pickett’s Charge. He was taken to Fort McHenry in Baltimore on July 6, 1863 and was immediately sent on to Fort Delaware. Then, in October of 1863 he was moved to Point Lookout where he remained until January 27, 1865 when he was sent to a US General Hospital. The records show that James died of chronic diarrhea on March 31, 1865 and was buried in grave number 1066 at Point Lookout Confederate Cemetery. His name is not listed on monument there but appears in a book, "Point Lookout Prison Camp and Hospital" by Richard H Triebe, page 296.

The last three items in this lot are a post-war albumen, tintype and letter belonging to Henry J. O’Bannon a veteran of the 8th Virginia Infantry and married to Martha, the sister of Joshua M. Hutchison mentioned above.

The tintype is a waist-up view of O’Bannon in a slight right profile wearing a light-colored wool jacket and vest. He sports longish hair, beard and mustache. Contrast and clarity are very good. Tin is not matted or cased and has a slight waviness to the face.

The albumen is a copy of the tintype however, O’Bannon’s hair and mustache and eyes have been highlighted in regular gray pencil. Image has no photographers mark but does have photographer’s instructions written all over the back. Also on the reverse is a modern ink inscription of “CIVIL WAR SOLDIER 8TH VA. REG.” and “HENRY J. O’BANNON” over “UNCLE HENRY MARRIED TO SISTER OF MARTHA MANKIN HUTCHISON.” The last notation is incorrect, as stated above Henry was married to Joshua M. Hutchison’s sister Martha E. Hutchison.

The letter is four pages written in period pencil and dated 1904. It is written to someone named David and talks about getting family information from someone named “Boney.” There is also a long poem that talks about grieving for a loved one who has died. O’Bannon’s wife Martha died two years before this letter was written so she is probably the subject of the poem.

Henry J. O’Bannon (also spelled O’Banion in the records) was born August 5, 1831. He enlisted as a sergeant in Company G, 8th Virginia Infantry at Centreville on July 16, 1861. He was wounded badly in his arm at Ball’s Bluff on October 21, 1861 and was sent to Winder General Hospital in Richmond. After his recovery he was detailed as a nurse. He remained at on hospital duty until October 15, 1864 when he left Stuart Hospital in Richmond and returned to his Company.

O’Bannon was captured at Farmville on April 6, 1865 and sent to Point Lookout, Maryland. He took the Oath of Allegiance and was released on June 5, 1865.

In 1884 he married Martha E. Hutchison in Frying Pan, Fairfax, Virgnia. Nothing else is known of his post-war life.

He died on November 12, 1920 and is buried in Frying Pan Meeting House Baptist Church Cemetery in Herndon, Virginia. [ad] [ph:L]

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