LIEUTENANT’S FROCK COAT, PANTS, AND PHOTO OF STANLEY B. LOCKWOOD 105th OHIO

$5,950.00 ON HOLD

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 1117-120

This identified officer’s grouping consists of the regulation frock coat and trousers of First Lieutenant Stanley B. Lockwood of the 105th Ohio, along with a postwar framed photograph of him in civilian clothes, nicely identified on the reverse. At the beginning of the war Lockwood (1839-1884) was partner with older brother John in a dry goods business in Painesville, OH. He served in two units, serving first as a 2nd lieutenant in the 2nd Ohio Cavalry, enlisting 8/22/61 being commissioned 2nd lieutenant of Co. G on 10/14/61. The regiment was posted to Missouri in January 1862 and saw their first action in February when a scouting party of some 120 men fought and routed and group of Confederate guerillas at Independence. Lockwood resigned from the unit 6/1/62 and two months later joined the 105th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting 8/10/62 and mustering in as First Sergeant of Co. D on 8/21/62.

The regiment had been organized in Cleveland, and served in the Army of Ohio and Army of Cumberland, spending most of its time from November 1862 in the 14th Corps. Mustering in for three years on Aug. 20 and 21, 1862, it was immediately posted to Louisville, Kentucky, from where it moved to Perryville in October, losing in the battle 48 killed and 217 wounded, some mortally. It then moved into Tennessee and took part in the Tullahoma Campaign. At Chickamauga it lost 80 men killed and wounded, and was at Chattanooga, took part in Missionary Ridge and the Atlanta Campaign, followed by the March to the Sea and the Campaign of the Carolinas. It mustered out in Washington 3 June 1865.

Signing up as a First Sergeant was a step down in rank, but Lockwood may have been promised promotion and was, in fact, made 2nd Lt. of Co. D on 1/15/1863 and then 1st Lt. of Co. K on 5/12/63, though not before being wounded in the cheek while still a first sergeant at the Battle of Perryville 10/8/62. He was promoted 6/8/64, to Regimental Quartermaster (also a first lieutenant by rank,) likely because of his clerical and business background. His date of discharge is unclear from published records and we have not yet pulled the muster rolls, but he was with the regiment through the fall of Atlanta. He is mentioned in the regimental history as heading home on 9/27/64, but in the context of furloughs and leaves of absence granted after Atlanta, and the Register of Volunteer Forces includes him on the “roster of officers as it stood on the day of muster out.” The reason for a leave of absence was likely to get married, which he did on 10/13/64. Since leaves were customarily thirty days, this would have gotten him back to the regiment in time for the March to the Sea and the Campaign of the Carolinas, which would have kept a quartermaster rather busy.

Lockwood returned to Painesville and in 1870 is listed as a dealer in boots and shoes. His photograph was taken by a San Francisco firm likely between 1874 and 1878, but he was back in Ohio and sick by 1880, when he is a patient in the Cleveland Asylum with paresis, and where he dies of paralysis in 1884. His wife lived until 1914 and remarried, but chose to be buried beside him.

Lockwood’s uniform coat is the regulation Civil War coat for line officers: a single breasted dark blue frock coat with 9 buttons down the front, four on the rear waist and tails, and three smaller buttons on each cuff. The buttons are all staff buttons backmarked Waterbury Button Co. / Extra Rich and appear original to the coat with no signs of restitching. There are pockets in the tails and one interior left breast pocket. The cuffs are non-functional. The collar is lined in blue velvet. The shoulder straps are securely attached and are gilt bullion 1st Lieutenant of staff with regulation black background and with a single border. They borders show some rubbing, but lots of gilt a tiny moth nip or two to the nap of the fabric.

The coat has scattered moth damage that could be backed: on the wearer’s left shoulder and on the left lapel for the first four buttons. Three larger holes are on the right collar, shoulder, and lower front, some on the upper skirt, with smaller nips on the sleeve at the upper arm and a few near the cuff. The left sleeve shows scattered nips with one large a few small near the cuff, with the more obvious on the reverse.

The interior is very good, showing just natural wear to the shoulders and chest. The white/cream color sleeve linings are in place. The green quilted body lining is very good as are green lined skirts. Inside the breast pocket we found a note that the coat had been worn by “Waldo Warner” at a Valentines Masquerade 14 Feb. 1905.

The pants are regulation dark blue. Along the waist band are six suspender buttons, and a closure button, along waist band, four fly buttons. All are matching and securely sewn. The rear of the waist has a short split V, covered by short fabric adjusting belt with two-prong buckle. There are two large frog pockets and one watch pocket. The bullion cord sewn into each leg seam came loose at some point, but was kept and is in one pocket. The pants lined in the seat. The cuffs narrow very slightly and are lined in the front and sides, but not the rear. The seat shows some repaired tears on the exterior (not extending to the lining.) The pants have good color and are solid. There are a few small moth nips, tracking and stains mostly on left hip and side.

The photo of Lockwood is a mid-chest up view in civilian clothes with a Bradley and Rulofson backmark dating it to the mid-1870s. It is in the original frame with a paper label at top reverse reading “Stanley Lockwood” in pen. That photographic partnership lasted until Rulofson’s death in 1878. Mention of “gold medals won over all competitors” likely dates it after 1873 or 1874, when they won medals at Vienna and Philadelphia. There are a number of Lockwood family papers in the Western Reserve Historical Society cataloged under the name of Stanley’s brother George, who served in the 7th Ohio, but the archive seems to contain material related to Stanley and the family in general also.

This is nicely identified officer’s uniform coat and pants and makes a great display when laid out or set up with a photo of the man who wore it.  [sr] [ph:m]

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