WAR OF 1812 PATTERN 1808 US INFANTRY CARTRIDGE BOX

$895.00 ON HOLD

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 490-3079

This is a very nice example of the regulation infantry cartridge box from 1808 to the introduction of those carrying embossed eagles on their flaps in 1828. Developed in 1807 and first delivered in 1808, boxes of this pattern were intended to equip an expanding army in the wake of rising tensions with Great Britain, and saw service with U.S. and state forces throughout that period, through the war of 1812, and beyond. We know of at least one example from the Rosentsteel collection, implying that they were reissued from state inventories in the south by necessity as late as the Civil War.

The pattern utilizes a wood block bored for 26 cartridges for the .69 caliber musket and a tinned iron tray underneath with room for flints, accessories, and another 12 cartridges, bringing its combat load up to 38. This improved on the boxes of the 1790s in at least two ways: it reverted to use of a wide shoulder belt rather than carriage as a belly box on a simple waist belt, or waist belt supplemented with strap passing around the back of the neck; it also increased carrying capacity from the typical 24 rounds of most boxes of that period. This follows the standard design in having a single narrow retaining strap, in this case ¾ inch wide, sewn across the back, through which the ends of the shoulder sling would pass, to fasten with buckles sewn to the bottom of the box. The retaining strap is intact and secure, showing just a bit of stretching on one side from having had a belt through it. The strap would admit a belt of about 2 ½ inches, matching contract proposals citing belts of 2 ½ or 2 ¼ inch width (with the possible exception of the very first contract, which might have used a 3 inch belt.) The flat iron buckles are still firmly on the bottom of the box. The latch tab and fastening button for the flap are missing, but these were both of leather and simply sewn in place.

The box may date early. It has typical, thick tombstone shaped side panels, but no sign of an inner flap, showing up on these about 1828, or side ears on the outer flap, introduced about 1820, both to better seal and waterproof the box. The cover flap is squared along the bottom rather than scalloped, which could be a contractor variation or indicate a state or private purchase. The side panels have a simple, but decorative line of stitching, likely pointing that way, as do the incised lines across the top of the box front and on the pocket flap, and the light, but visible lines on the outer flap, including what seems to be a flower with three long leaves at bottom center. Access to the bottom tray is by lifting out the block, a variation to use of a gusseted flap on the front of the box to access the center section of the tray through the box’s lower front, the wedge shaped flap here being a simple pocket for cleaning rags, tools, or flints, in addition to space in the lower tray.

This displays nicely and the condition is very good. The stitching is tight. The finish shows typical craquelure from age, but has good color and surface, and the buckles and retaining strap are firmly in place. See Fred Gaede’s CMH 1985 article on these boxes for details on the U.S. production and contracts, as well other publications on arms and equipment of the War of 1812. [sr] [ph:m]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

CLICK HERE FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS.

THANK YOU!

Inquire About WAR OF 1812 PATTERN 1808 US INFANTRY CARTRIDGE BOX

should be empty

featured item

COLONEL OF TEXAS CAVALRY AND MAJOR GENERAL ARTHUR PENDLETON BAGBY: BY LAND AND BY SEA!

Arthur Pendleton Bagby led his Texas cavalry troopers in fights on horseback, on foot, and on shipboard. He rose from Major to Major General, his last two promotions, to brigadier and major general courtesy of Kirby Smith, who had to run the… (1138-1993). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

27
Jan
Instagram