GROUP OF FOUR DAN SICKLES CABINET CARD PHOTOGRAPHS

$950.00

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Item Code: 2021-951

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Offered here is a group of four different cabinet card views of U.S. General Dan Sickles. The four cabinet cards each measure 6.5" x 4.25" overall. The actual image size on each is approximately 3" x 2". All cards feature a gilt edge. There are no photographer's imprints or backmarks on any of the cards.

First is a view of Sickles, seated, in Brigadier-General's uniform holding a sword across his lap. He wears a double-breasted frock with regulation one-star shoulder straps. Image is clear with good contrast; perhaps a hair on the dark side.

Next is a view of Sickles in Major-General's uniform. He wears a double-breasted frock with regulation two-star shoulder straps. Image is clear with very good contrast.

The last two images appear to be from the same sitting. One is a profile view of Sickles in a non-regulation Major-General's uniform. He wears a single-breasted frock or sack coat with non-regulation two-star shoulder straps (stars with no border). Image is clear with good contrast. In the follow-up shot he wears the same non-regulation coat. In this view we can also see a military style vest and he wears a slouch hat. The coat has the non-regulation, non-bordered shoulder straps. Clarity and contrast are very good.

Daniel Edgar Sickles (October 20, 1819 – May 3, 1914) was an American politician, soldier, and diplomat.

Born to a wealthy family in New York City, Sickles was involved in a number of scandals, most notably the 1859 homicide of his wife's lover, U.S. Attorney Philip Barton Key II, whom Sickles gunned down in broad daylight in Lafayette Square, across the street from the White House. He was acquitted after using temporary insanity as a legal defense for the first time in United States history.

UpIn the Civil War, Sickles became one of the war's most prominent political generals, recruiting the New York regiments that became known as the Excelsior Brigade in the Army of the Potomac. Despite his lack of military experience, he served as a brigade, division, and corps commander in the early Eastern campaigns. His military career ended at the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, after he moved his Corps without orders to an untenable position, where they suffered heavy casualties. Sickles himself was wounded by cannon fire at Gettysburg and had to have his leg amputated. He was eventually awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions.

After the war, he was appointed as a commander for military districts in the South during Reconstruction. He also served as U.S. Minister to Spain under President Ulysses S. Grant. Later he was re-elected to Congress, where he helped pass legislation to preserve the Gettysburg Battlefield.

Sickles lived out the remainder of his life in New York City, dying on May 3, 1914, at the age of 94. His funeral was held at St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan on May 8, 1914. He was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.  [jet] [ph:L]

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