MUSEUM QUALITY THREE-QUARTER SEATED VIEW OF GENERAL JEB STUART

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Item Code: 1138-510

Image is the well-known seated view of Stuart wearing double-breasted frock coat and dark trousers with wide leg stripe, gauntlets, knee high boots, belt, sash, sword and holding his famous ostrich plumed slouch hat in his lap.

Clarity and contrast are outstanding. Paper and mount are also excellent.

Reverse has no photographer’s imprint but does have an old pencil inscription of “STUART, JAMES EWELL BROWN (GEN.)” along with other collector information in pencil at bottom.

From the collection of the late William A. Turner.

James Ewell Brown Stuart, known as Jeb to his associates, was born February 6, 1833 in Patrick County, Virginia.  He attended Emory and Henry College and then West Point, where he graduated 13th of 46 in 1854.

In his U.S. service, Stuart was involved in several Indian conflicts, the “Bleeding Kansas” incident at the Kansas-Missouri border, and then accompanied Colonel Robert E. Lee to crush John Brown’s raid at Harpers Ferry.

Stuart resigned from the United States army in May of 1861 to join the Confederacy and was assigned to General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, who promoted him to colonel early on and assigned him to command the cavalry of the Army of the Shenandoah.  Stuart led his command in the First Battle of Bull Run and in March of 1862, he became commander of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia.

Stuart was a master of reconnaissance missions, and twice made daring exploits, first in the Peninsula Campaign and again at Antietam.  He gained promotion to major general after he executed successful raids at Catlett’s Station and Rappahannock River, and then performed in a defensive role at the Battle of Fredericksburg.  After the mortal wounding of Jackson during the battle of Chancellorsville, Stuart temporarily assumed command of Jackson's Second Corps and was influential in exploiting the success of his predecessor's famous flank attack.

In spite of Stuart's brilliant reputation (or perhaps because of it), his performance during the Gettysburg Campaign has been the subject much debate and controversy.  Prior to 1863 the Federal mounted arm had been repeatedly embarrassed by Stuart. But, in June of 1863 he failed to detect the movements of the Union cavalry that would eventually instigate the largest cavalry battle of the war at Brandy Station, Virginia, in which Stuart prevailed by a narrow margin.  Just under a month later, Stuart’s cavalry fell out of touch with headquarters in the days leading up to Gettysburg, and left Lee with little to no intelligence in unfamiliar enemy territory. Stuart finally arrived late on the second day of the battle at Gettysburg and the following day was repulsed by Union cavalry.

Stuart fought his final battle on the outskirts of Richmond on May 11, 1864.  The Confederate cavalry was working feverishly to deny Gen. Philip Sheridan's Federal horsemen from gaining entry into the Confederate capital.  Stuart's men were able to check the Union advance but at a terrible cost.  The Confederate cavalry chief was shot by a dismounted Michigan trooper with a pistol, and the wound proved fatal.  He died the day after the battle, May 12, 1864 and was buried at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond.  [jet] [ph:L]

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