CDV OF C.S. GENERAL EDWARD W. GANTT IN CIVILIAN CLOTHES

$250.00

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Item Code: 1138-147

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This is a waist-up seated view of Gantt. He wears civilian clothes. Image is crisp with good contrast. Photographer’s backmark, E. & H.T. ANTHONY, New York.

Edward W. Gantt (17 March 1829 – 10 June 1874) was a Confederate Brigadier General. An ardent secessionist, Gantt was a delegate to the Southern Rights Convention in 1850 in Nashville. He became active in Democratic politics in Arkansas and was elected to the First Confederate Congress in 1861. On July 29, 1861, he was elected colonel of the 12th Arkansas Infantry, which he helped raise. He was stationed near Columbus, Kentucky. On December 5, 1861, he took command of a brigade of two Arkansas regiments at Fort Thompson near New Madrid, Missouri. In early 1862, General P. G. T. Beauregard appointed Gantt an acting brigadier general. The Union Army of General John Pope attacked Fort Thompson on March 13, 1862. Gantt and his command fled across the Mississippi River and eventually surrendered on April 7, 1862 near Tiptonville, Tennessee. As a prisoner, Gantt was exchanged in August of 1862 and returned to Arkansas. Confederate leaders were reluctant to assign him to further duty because of rumors about his drinking and womanizing. Dissatisfied with his inability to secure a command, in the fall of 1863, Gantt became a Union sympathizer. He fled to Union lines and appealed to his fellow Southerners to lay down their arms. His appeals were regarded by Southerners as those of a traitor.

Gantt moved to Little Rock (Pulaski County) in 1866 and became prosecuting attorney in 1868, pushing Radical Reconstruction. Throughout 1867 and 1868, he supported Union Clubs, which backed Republican Ulysses S. Grant for the presidency in 1868. Opposed by many unreconstructed Confederates, Gantt faced constant death threats and at times carried seven guns. Two Little Rock businessmen who opposed his radicalism severely beat him in 1869.

The strain and violence of Radical Reconstruction forced him to resign as prosecutor in 1870. Needing a respite, he turned his attention to codifying the laws of Arkansas in 1873. On June 10, 1874, Gantt suffered a heart attack and died. He is buried in Tulip (Dallas County).  [jet] [ph:L]

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