1862 DATED VIEW OF GENERAL FITZHUGH LEE – NEPHEW OF GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE

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Item Code: 1138-281

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CDV is a waist-up view of Lee in Confederate uniform with his signature long beard partially obscuring the general’s rank on his collar.

Contrast and clarity are excellent. Mount is good while the paper has a small dirt spot in the lower right corner. Bottom of mount has 1862 publishing information.

Reverse has a photographer’s imprint for E. & H. T. ANTHONY… NEW YORK. Reverse also has a modern pencil ID as well as some collector information in pencil at bottom.

From the collection of the late William A. Turner.

Fitzhugh Lee was the nephew of General Robert E. Lee. He was born November 19, 1835 and was an 1856 graduate of West Point. Lee had pre-war service in the 2nd US Cavalry. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War Lee joined the Confederate Army as a Lieutenant of Cavalry and during 1st Bull Run served on the staff of Brigadier General Richard Ewell. He then served as lieutenant colonel of the 1st Virginia Cavalry under Jeb Stuart. Lee eventually rose to command the regiment and was commissioned a brigadier general on July 24, 1862 and major general on August 3, 1863. He commanded a brigade under General Stuart and later a division. After Stuart’s death, Wade Hampton assumed command of the Confederate cavalry. Lee served under him until Hampton was sent to Joe Johnston’s Army in North Carolina. Once Hampton left Lee assumed command of the cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia and commanded it till the surrender at Appomattox.

After the war, Lee devoted himself to farming in Stafford County, Virginia, and was conspicuous in his efforts to reconcile the Southern people to the issue of the war, which he regarded as a final settlement of the questions at issue. In 1875, he attended the Battle of Bunker Hill centennial at Boston and delivered a remarkable address. In 1885, he was a member of the board of visitors of West Point, and from 1886 to 1890 was governor of Virginia having defeated in 1885 Republican John Sergeant Wise.

In April 1896, Lee was appointed consul-general at Havana by President Cleveland, with duties of a diplomatic and military character added to the usual consular business. In this post (in which he was retained by President William McKinley until 1898) he was from the first called upon to deal with a situation of great difficulty, which culminated with the destruction of the warship USS Maine. Upon the declaration of war between Spain and the United States, he re-entered the army.

He was one of four ex-Confederate general officers who were made major generals of United States Volunteers. Fitzhugh Lee commanded the 7th Army Corps, but took no part in the actual operations in Cuba. He was military governor of Havana and Pinar del Río in 1899, subsequently commanded the Department of the Missouri, and retired in 1901 as a brigadier general, U.S. Army.

Lee died in Washington, D.C., and is buried in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia.  [ad] [ph:L]

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