SEATED VIEW OF 4TH VIRGINIA CAVALRY OFFICER IN CIVILIAN CLOTHES – FORMER VMI CADET

$550.00

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Item Code: 1138-1063

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Image is from the collection of the late William A. Turner and comes with a portion of an album page that reads “JOHN S. MEREDITH, 4TH VIRGINIA CAVALRY CO… VIRGINIA.”

CDV shows Meredith seated at a table wearing a dark civilian suit and dark gloves. He is posed with his hands in his lap in a slight left profile.

Contrast and clarity are excellent. Mount and paper have light surface dirt. Nothing more than is usually seen.

Reverse has a photographer’s imprint for THE LONDON STEREOSCOPIC AND PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPNAY.

John Scott Meredith was born in Hanover County, Virginia on July 29, 1824. He attended VMI and was in the class of 1845 for 2 years but did not graduate. He then attended the University of Virginia Law School and practiced law in Richmond.

Meredith enlisted as a private in Company K, 4th Virginia Cavalry on April 27, 1862. He was commissioned a 2nd lieutenant on August 14, 1862 and was given a leave of absence the following December. He resigned due to ill health on March 12, 1863.

While Meredith was with the 4th it was engaged at Williamsburg, Slatersville, Hanover Court House, 2nd Manassas, South Mountain, Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg plus numerous smaller encounters.

After his resignation Meredith returned to practicing law in Stafford County, Virginia where he died on April 14, 1917 and was buried in Aquia Episcopal Church Cemetery in Aquia, Virginia. [ad][ph:L]

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