CDV OF TEXAS SENATOR LOUIS T. WIGFALL

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Item Code: 1139-205

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Carte de visite photograph of Wigfall in civilian clothes. Chest-up view. Image is clear with very good contrast. Pencil identification on back. Photographer's backmark, D. Appleton & Co., New York.

Louis Trezevant Wigfall (April 21, 1816 – February 18, 1874) was a politician who served as a Confederate States Senator from Texas from 1862 to 1865. He was among a group of leading secessionists known as Fire-Eaters, advocating the preservation and expansion of an aristocratic agricultural society based on slave labor. He briefly served as a Confederate Brigadier General of the Texas Brigade at the outset of the Civil War before taking his seat in the Confederate Senate. Wigfall's reputation for oratory and hard-drinking, along with a combative nature and high-minded sense of personal honor, made him one of the more imposing political figures of his time.

At the conclusion of hostilities, Wigfall escaped back to Texas in the company of Texas troops with a forged parole, then went to London in 1866 as an exile, where he intrigued to foment trouble between Britain and the United States. He bought a mine in Clear Creek, Colorado, returning to the United States in 1870. He lived for a while in Baltimore, Maryland, and was back in Galveston, Texas by January of 1874. He died a month later of "apoplexy" and is buried there in the Trinity Episcopal cemetery.  [jet] [ph:L]

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