BUST VIEW ATTRIBUTED TO CAPTAIN GEORGE A. KENSEL OF GENERAL BENJAMIN BUTLER’S STAFF

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Item Code: 490-6199E

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CDV is a bust view believed to be of Captain George A. Kensel. This image was matched to a view of General Benjamin Butler’s staff and the eyes and odd chin beard are a match. Also, the item came from a collector of General Butler items.

Image shows Kensel in a dark frock coat with captain’s shoulder straps.

Contrast and clarity are excellent. Paper and mount are very good however there is a very faint diagonal crease running from the right edge, through the subject’s face and to the right edge. Crease is only evident if one looks closely and catches the light just right.

Reverse has a photographer’s imprint for R. W. ADDIS… WASHINGTON, D.C. with an ID in modern pencil.

His published obituary reads as follows:

“Colonel George A. Kensel, of the United States Army, who died at New Haven, Connecticut, on the 17th instant, was a native of Philadelphia and at an early age removed to Lexington, Kentucky, where he received an appointment from the Hon. John C. Breckinridge as a cadet to West Point. He proved an apt and brilliant student and was graduated with distinction in the class of 1857 as a Brevet Second Lieutenant in the artillery service. He was ordered to duty with Captain Phillip’s Battery, Fourth Artillery, on an expedition against the Mormons, the force being under the command of General Albert Sidney Johnson. He remained on the plains until the fall of 1860, when he was transferred to Fortress Monroe. On the breaking out of the war he was promoted to First Lieutenant and immediately thereafter he was made a Captain and Assistant Quartermaster and was ordered to Boston. The services of skilled and trusted officers being required at the scenes of actual conflict, he was ordered to Battery H, Fifth Artillery, in October 1861 and he at once distinguished himself as a brave and efficient officer. His valor equaled his skilled acquirements on all occasions and received marked recognitions from his commanding officers. He was in the thick of the fight at the first Bull Run, in Griffin’s Battery and was brevetted a Major in September 1863, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the Battle of Chickamauga. He was subsequently brevetted a Lieutenant Colonel for distinguished gallantry while serving as Chief of Artillery of the Department of the Gulf under General Butler and of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina in the Battle of Drury’s Bluff. His gallant conduct on all occasions earned for him rapid promotion and after serving as Assistant Inspector General at the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, he was brevetted a Colonel March 13, 1865. At the close of the war his services were not less in demand and after serving four years as Assistant Professor of Mathematics at the West Point Academy he was ordered to his battery at Fort Warren, Boston in June 1869. The following year his battery was ordered to Fort Trumbull and in May 1873, he was made an Assistant Professor at the artillery school at Fortress Monroe. After a year’s service there, he was ordered again to Fort Trumbull and he was subsequently stationed with his battery at Fort Barracks, Florida and at Charleston. While at the latter station he was ordered to Keyser Station, West Virginia, with a battalion of artillery to suppress the rioters who threatened to destroy the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. He was ordered to Atlanta, Georgia, in Mach 1879, where he was still stationed when he was attacked with congestion of the brain. He was at once removed to the residence of his brother-in-law, Mr. Frederick Barton, in New Haven, where his illness terminated with death at the age of forty-four years and nine months. Throughout his career in the army, Colonel Kensel was distinguished as a capable, trusted and valiant soldier and as a chivalrous and accomplished gentleman. Like the Chevalier Bayard [Pierre Terrail, seigneur de Bayard (1473-1524)] he was without fear and without reproach. To his many and eminent qualities of mind and heart he added the graces of a genial and well beloved comrade and his estimable qualities of mind and heart were for him troops of friends by whom his death will be deeply mourned. His domestic relations were marked by a warmth and tenderness of affection, the memory of which will long remains as a sweet and indefinable fragrance and his loss to wife, children and friends is irreparable. Colonel Kensel married a daughter of the late Colonel N.A. Thompson of this city, who, with four children, survive him.”

Kensel is buried in the United States Military Academy Post Cemetery, West Point, New York.  [ad][ph:L]

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