FULL STANDING VIEW OF GENERAL EDWARD BAKER KILLED AT BALL’S BLUFF

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Item Code: 1228-22

CDV shows Baker posed in front of a painted backdrop of a large Army camp. He is posed holding his “Hardee Hat” in his hand. He wears a dark double-breasted frock coat and matching trousers but no belts or accoutrements.

Contrast and clarity are good. Mount has clipped corners.

Reverse has a photographer’s imprint for EARLE’S… PHILADELPHIA. Top has a period pencil ID of “COL. BAKER.”

The Union Army, vol. 8 supplies the following biography:

“Edward D. Baker brigadier-general, was born in London, England, Feb. 24, 1811, and four years later was brought to America by his father, who selected Philadelphia as his place of residence.  There Edward D. grew to manhood and at the age of nineteen started for the new West and selected Springfield, Ill., as his home.  Amid struggles with poverty he studied law, and established a practice in Greene county and soon became noted as one of the leading advocates of the state.  In 1837 he was sent to the legislature by the Whig party, and then to the state senate, serving from 1840 until 1844.  In the latter year he was elected to Congress, but left his seat in 1846 to raise a company of Illinois volunteers for the Mexican war, served as one of the most brilliant officers of the army in all the actions on the route to the city of Mexico.  At Cerro Gordo he succeeded to the command of Gen. Shields' brigade, which he led until the close of the war.  He was honorably mustered out of the service on May 29, 1847, and, returning to Illinois was again elected to Congress and served from 1849 until 1851.  Declining a re-election, he removed to San Francisco, where he became distinguished as the head of the bar, and as one of the most eloquent speakers in the state.  In 1860 he removed to Oregon and was sent to the United States senate by the united votes of the Republicans and Douglas Democrats.  When the opening blow was struck at Fort Sumter, at a great mass-meeting in New York on April 20, he made a thrilling appeal for the preservation of the Union. Raising the "California" regiment in New York and Philadelphia, he entered the war, and at the fatal battle of Ball's bluff he led the brigade with undaunted courage, and fell pierced with several wounds, Oct. 21, 1861.  He was given the commission of brigadier-general of volunteers on May 17, 1861, but declined it; was commissioned colonel on June 21, and was advanced to major-general of volunteers on Sept. 21, 1861, but had not accepted the appointment at the time he was killed.”

General Baker is buried in the San Francisco National Cemetery, in San Francisco, California.    [ad][ph:L]

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