SIXTH-PLATE AMBROTYPE OF MILITARY BANDSMAN WITH OVER-THE-SHOULDER HORN

$1,200.00
Originally $1,500.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 1139-20

Shipping: Determined by Method & Location of buyer

To Order:
Call 717-334-0347,
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This bandsman wears a dark frock coat and kepi, and cradles an over-the-shoulder horn against one shoulder. His coat has the usual nine button front, with the buttons lightly gilt by the photographer. His collar shows light-colored panels and piping. The coat appears to have narrow shoulder straps, either to mount epaulets or simply added for a bit of flair: extra trimming for the band uniforms coming from a regimental fund or the colonel’s pocket. The coat seems to be piped down the lapel and a narrow stripe shows on his trouser leg. The cuff shows three buttons, gilt, and a placket outlined in red.

His cap has narrow braid around the base of the crown and up the sides. A single numeral is visible on the front of his cap that is very slightly blurred, and might have been touched up by the photographer, something also suggested by the fact that it appears to be a “9,” but does not appear to be reversed. One immediately thinks of the 9th New York, Hawkins Zouaves, whose band stayed in service after other bands at the regimental level had been discharged, but the uniform details do not fit.

This is matted, glassed and framed, and is housed in the lower section of a leatherette case without the cover. The bandsman is probably in his thirties and wears a neatly trimmed mustache and goatee, looking fairly serious for the camera. The image shows him seated, wish one arm resting on a table and the other cradling the horn. As matted, he is shown from the knees-up. The plate actually shows him from mid-calf up, in a simple wooden chair. Some scouting around might reveal his unit. The cap number makes it clear he is attached to a military unit. Experts will better identify the horn, but it seems to fall into the class of Saxhorn, with characteristic three valves clearly shown. There is some solarization and he apparently wore white gloves that come across as slightly over-exposed, but there is nice detail visible and the figure is strong. Even after regimental bands were reduced in Fall 1862, some stayed in service to function at brigade, division or higher levels. The infantry fighting at Gettysburg opened to a rendition of “The Campbells are Coming” from a Federal brigade band entering the field. [sr] [ph:m]

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