CAYUGA INDIAN TRADE BEADS AND COPPER BRACELET

$195.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 236-124

This is a collection of trade items recovered from a Cayuga Indian site in Geneva, New York. These pieces date to the 1620-1760 period.

Included is the bowl of a small clay smoking pipe, a copper bracelet made of wire with turned ends, and a nice collection of trade beads. There are several loose beads and a set that were strung together as a bracelet. All come in an 8” x 6” display case.

The Cayuga belong to the Iroquoian language family, and were one of the original Five Nations of the League of the Iroquois, who lived in New York. The Five Nations were the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca and Cayuga. When the Tuscarora joined the Iroquois Confederation in 1722, the confederacy was known as the Six Nations. The Cayuga lived primarily between Owasco and Cayuga lakes. Jesuits founded missions among the Cayuga in the mid-17th century. In 1660, there were approximately 1,500 Cayuga. In the beginning of the 18th century, the Cayuga primarily lived in three villages. The Cayuga became trading partner with the French from Canada and were active in the beaver fur trade. [jet]  [ph:L]

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