IDENTIFIED UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY BADGE: JAMES HENRY PARKER- SCARCE NEW YORK CHAPTER!

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Item Code: 286-1103

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A very good condition membership badge for the United Daughters of the Confederacy, organized in 1894, featuring an enameled first national Confederate flag suspended at bottom by a red/white/red ribbon, the red slightly orange, but imitating the stripes on the flag. The flag is contained in an open wreath with star at top and knot at bottom with the superimposed dates 61 and 65. Between the upper edge of the wreath and lower edge of the flag is a somewhat off-center UDC monogram.

The upper bar is engraved in script “James Henry Parker,” which was taken by the previous owner to identify it as belonging to a female relative of James H. Parker of the 58th Virginia, who was wounded at Spotsylvania, though we could not rule out a number of other James H. Parkers, or James Parkers listed with no middle name or initial. It seems far more likely, however, that the name refers to the James Henry Parker UDC Chapter 1984 of New York, making this a pretty scarce example of the UDC badge. The rear of the badge, in addition to a stamped maker’s mark, bears the engraved initials H.F.C., certainly those of the UDC member who owned it.

Parker had served in a Confederate cavalry outfit during the war and after a brief postwar stint practicing medicine turned to “mercantile pursuits” and moved to New York City. He was nevertheless active in Confederate veteran affairs and at one time commander of the UCV Camp of New York. His wife was equally prominent in UDC affairs and set up the chapter named in his honor after his death in 1915, becoming its honorary life president.  She was also known as the author of a “Hymn to the Confederate flag.

The Confederate Veteran Magazine of March 1915 prints his obituary as follows:

“Dr. Parker, whose death occurred on January 27, 1915, was one of the best-known and most highly esteemed men of the South, who sought this city to finish the activities of life after a dedication of it for four years to the service of his country. He was born in North Carolina and entered the service of the Confederacy, in the 62d Georgia Cavalry, at the age of nineteen. Later he was transferred to a North Carolina brigade and rendered gallant and conspicuous service to the cause he had espoused and held so dear. His funeral services were held at the Church of the Messiah, New York City, on the afternoon of January 28 and were attended by a large number of his friends and many of his surviving comrades. His remains were afterwards taken to South Carolina for burial. In her bereavement the tenderest and most loving sympathies of the Camp go out in unstinted measure to Mrs. Parker, so long and ably the President of the New York Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy.”

The 62nd GA Cavalry was formed of three North Carolina companies and seven Georgia companies after the merger of the 2nd and 15th Georgia Partisan Rangers in Fall 1862. They served in Georgia, North Carolina and were assigned to Deering’s Brigade, ANV, in May 1864. They disbanded in July, with the companies being reassigned to units from their respective states, the 8th GA Cavalry and 16th NC Cavalry Battalion.

Some further research might identify “H.F.C.” engraved on the back of the badge. This is a nice looking badge in any case, with an interesting connection to northern members of the UDC.  [sr] [ph:L]

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