BEAUTIFULLY PAINTED & IDENTIFIED US WORLD WAR ONE MODEL 1917 HELMET WITH 29th DIVISION INSIGNIA AND BATTLE HONORS

$995.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 490-4655

Standard issue US Model 1917 helmet with a dark OD painted exterior and moderate sand finish. Exterior shows light wear and dirt from age, use and storage.

Interior has an original liner and chinstrap; both are in good condition. Helmet’s interior surface shows some light rust but nothing major.

Painted on the front of the crown is the blue and gray ying-yang symbol of the 29th U.S. Infantry Division which was made up of National Guardsmen from Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia and Washington, D.C. Painted on the rim, around the base of the crown, are the battle honors. There are four and they are evenly spaced around the rim. Each word is done in 1.00-inch-high letters in dark red paint outlined in white. They are “VERDUN”, “ALSACE”, “MEUSE” and “ARGONNE.”

The underside of the rim has the same type lettering done in dark red paint only and reads “SGT. 1CL EARLE CHAMBERLAIN. CO. C 104TH ENGINEERS 29TH DIV. U.S.A.”

Earle Chamberlain was born in Trenton, New Jersey on April 29, 1889.

When he entered the army, he was given serial #1271156 and joined Company C of the 1st Battalion, Engineers, State of New Jersey National Guard which later became the 104th Engineers. On June 19, 1918 at Hoboken, New Jersey, he embarked on the NORTHERN PACIFIC and sailed for France as a sergeant 1st class in Company C, 104th Engineers, 29th Division. Sometime after the Armistice, Chamberlain came down with influenza. He sailed home aboard the USS MANCHURIA leaving St. Nazaire on May 11, 1919.

After the war Chamberlain married in 1940 but unfortunately died on August 12, 1943. He is buried in Ewing Cemetery, Ewing, New Jersey.

The 29th Division was commanded throughout its existence in WW1 by Major General Charles G. Morton. It departed for the Western Front in June 1918 to join the American Expeditionary Forces. The division's advance detachment reached Brest, France on 8 June. In late September, the 29th received orders to join the U.S. First Army's Meuse–Argonne offensive as part of the French XVII Corps.

During its 21 days in combat, the 29th Division advanced seven kilometers, captured 2,148 prisoners, and knocked out over 250 machine guns or artillery pieces. Thirty percent of the division were casualties in the war, including 170 officers and 5,691 enlisted men were killed or wounded. Shortly thereafter the Armistice with Germany was signed on 11 November 1918, ending hostilities between the Central Powers and the Allied Powers. The division returned to the United States in May 1919. It demobilized on 30 May at Camp Dix, New Jersey.

Above is a photo of Earle Chamberlain later in life. [ad] [ph:L]

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