CASED AMBROTYPE OF GEORGE BERNARD IN UNIFORM, AND GOLD BROOCH WITH LOCK OF HAIR

$1,250.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 1138-1776

This sixth-plate ambrotype and engraved gold brooch with a lock of hair were formerly in the collection of Bill Turner, who specialized in collecting and dealing in Virginia material. His index card identifies the sitter as “Private Richard Bernard” and records that he obtained it with the brooch, engraved on the reverse “W.T.H. / July 5, 1864.” The initials are likely those of the person whose hair is in the locket.

The image is housed in leatherette case with separated hinge, but the glass, mat, and frame are in place. The subject is shown from the mid-chest up and wears a gray coat or jacket with a low standing collar and four buttons showing. He is bareheaded and wears a narrow mustache and chinbeard. The photographer has lightly tinted his cheeks and gilded the buttons. The brooch is gold, about 1-inch in diameter, with a black border in gold Greek key design, and a narrow roped inner border. The original T-bar pin is in place on the reverse. The engraving is professionally done in a beautiful script.

We have not pinned down the identity of the sitter or presenter of the locket. Bill obtained a lot of his material directly from Virginia families, so we don’t doubt the name he was given. Indeed, a quick check shows only one Richard Bernard and one Richard Barnard in Confederate ranks, both Virginians: Richard F. Bernard in the 13th VA and Richard J. Barnard in the 50th. The problem is that they are both listed in some sources as 17-years old, which seems too young for the man in the photo. We find a headstone for a Richard J. Barnard born in Virginia in 1835, which would be about right for the soldier in the image, and who is thought by one contributor to a genealogical listing to be the soldier in the 50th, but his gravestone says he died in 1871, whereas the soldier in the 50th died in 1864 at the Elmira prison camp after being captured at the Wilderness.

It might still be possible to identify both the image and the locket. The date on the brooch could be a date of presentation, or if it is a mourning piece, it could be a date of death. If a tentative identification could be made on that it might then be possible to establish a link with the Bernard family, or work the other way around. In any case, it is an interesting pairing and we are selling them together, just as they came from Bill’s collection.    [sr] [ph:M]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

CLICK HERE FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS.

THANK YOU!

Inquire About CASED AMBROTYPE OF GEORGE BERNARD IN UNIFORM, AND GOLD BROOCH WITH LOCK OF HAIR

should be empty