WHITE LINEN SHIRT IDENTIFIED TO CAPT. GEORGE FORDHAM, 3RD N.Y. INFANTRY

$495.00 SOLD

Quantity Available: None

Item Code: 1179-234

This is an outstanding example of a standard Civil War-era, long-sleeve shirt.

Fine white linen, pull-over type shirt. It has a roll collar and pleated four-button front. Sleeves gathered at shoulders and cuffs. Pleated front and cuffs were heavily starched. Re-enforced sleeve holes. All buttons are present. Light beige color overall with a couple of small, minor stains. Overall condition is very good.

Acquired from the Fordham family collection with initials (GEF), in ink, near bottom, front edge.

George E. Fordham enlisted on May 14, 1861 as a Private in Company D, 3rd New York Infantry. Promoted to Sergeant. Re-enlisted on May 25, 1863 and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant. Promoted to 1st Lieutenant on November 1, 1864 and Captain on December 1, 1864. George Fordham died on January 15, 1922. He is buried at Hampton National Cemetery in Hampton, Virginia, very near Fort Monroe.

The 3rd New York Infantry was ordered to Baltimore on July 1, 1861 and quartered at Fort McHenry until April 1, 1862. The Summer of 1862 was spent at Suffolk and on September 12, 1862, it was ordered to Fort Monroe. The Third was present during the siege of Suffolk, after which it was ordered to Folly Island, where it took an active part in the operations against Fort Wagner, the bombardment of Fort Sumter, and attacks on Charleston in the summer and autumn of 1863. In October 1863, it was returned to Virginia, where it was active in the advance under General Butler in May 1864.The regiment fought in the battle of Drewy's Buff and Cold Harbor, after which it was transferred to Bermuda Hundred and fought around Petersburg including the mine explosion of July 30, Fort Harrison, and the Darbytown Road. On December 3, 1864, the Third was sent to North Carolina where it was engaged at Fort Fisher, Sugar Loaf Battery, Fort Anderson and Wilmington. It remained in North Carolina until General Sherman's arrival and the close of the war. The regiment suffered 37 deaths from wounds and 85 from other causes, for a total of 122 fatalities. Of these, one officer was killed in combat while two more died from disease or accident. Thirty-six enlisted men were killed while 83 died from disease or accident.

A rare piece of clothing identified to a New York Infantry officer.   [jet] [ph::L]

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